Canada and Nova Scotia Enhancing Cooperation on Immigration - Comment from Canadian Immigration Attorney

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The Agreement for Canada-Nova Scotia Co-operation on Immigration provides Nova Scotia with more control over immigration to the province, facilitating the selection and retention of newcomers to meet labour market needs. Canadian immigration lawyer David Cohen comments on the implications from a legal perspective.

Successful labour market integration means an easier settlement process for the newcomer, a better retention rate for the nominating province, and a positive contribution to the Canadian economy.

Minister of Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Diane Finley and Minister of Immigration for Nova Scotia, Carolyn Bolivar-Getson signed the new cooperation agreement on September 19. The agreement renews the Nova Scotia Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) and clearly defines federal and provincial roles and responsibilities with respect to Nova Scotia immigration. It also highlights the importance of involving community stakeholders in welcoming newcomers to the province. Federal-provincial immigration partnerships have become increasingly common as provinces vie for Canadian immigrants to fuel population and labour force growth, says Canadian immigration Attorney David Cohen, of the law firm of Campbell Cohen.

The implications of the new Agreement for Canada-Nova Scotia Co-operation on Immigration are:

  • There will no longer be a limit on the number of individuals that Nova Scotia can nominate for Canadian Permanent Residency (under the Nova Scotia PNP), allowing the province to bring in more immigrants with skills in demand by Nova Scotia businesses.
  • Canada and Nova Scotia will work collaboratively on overseas immigration marketing initiatives, including promotion to international students and temporary foreign workers.
  • Through information sharing, Canada and Nova Scotia will develop and implement labour market integration strategies, including foreign credential recognition programs.
  • Nova Scotia's immigration targets will address particular social, demographic, economic development, and labour market needs.

Attorney Cohen is encouraged that the restriction on the number of Nova Scotia provincial nominees has been removed. "If we have more immigrants coming to Canada under Provincial Nomination Programs (with secured Canadian employment), we will have more newcomers successfully integrating into the Canadian workforce," he explains. "Successful labour market integration means an easier settlement process for the newcomer, a better retention rate for the nominating province, and a positive contribution to the Canadian economy."

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Courtney Mullins
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