Networking is Still the Best Way To Land a Job

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Larry Keim announces new job study results. "Most people still get jobs by networking, but I don't think they are as good at it as they once were because society has become overly dependent on technology. Technology is good, but it cannot replace one-on-one contact."

Everyone seems to think that with the proliferation of on-line job boards that there would be a huge swing to that form of career search (online boards) opening new doors.

Larry Keim has studied the trends of executive level job seekers for the past decade and is releasing the results of a study that demonstrates how people land jobs. What he reveals may surprise you.

Keim has reviewed the job market statistics from the past several decades and says that surprisingly enough, not much has changed. "Everyone seems to think that with the proliferation of on-line job boards that there would be a huge swing to that form of career search (online boards) opening new doors."

It turns out that the online job boards have merely replaced the newspaper as a place to look for jobs, but have done little to influence the more prominent avenue of networking as the best way to land a job. Keim calls newspapers and job boards "passive searches" as opposed to the more aggressive proactive networking approach.

Keim goes on to explain, "Most people still get jobs by networking, but I don't think they are as good at it as they once were because society has become overly dependent on technology. Technology is good, but it cannot replace one on one contact. The internet is best used as a tool to become more effective in building a network; not replacing it."

In the 1970's a survey by a Harvard sociologist showed that over 70% of jobs were obtained by networking. In that same decade the Department of Labor study showed that over 60% of jobs came this way. Studies in the 80's and 90's maintained similar statistics.

Current studies show that there was a slight downturn in networking as the primary source for gaining new employment, but still over 60%. But not as a result of online options.

Larry Keim says that complaints that networking is no longer effective are simply unfounded. "Nearly every study supports the fact that it (networking) has been the single most influential path toward a new career. I believe that people are not as good at networking as they once were, or are afraid of failure. You don't have to worry about rejection when you're in front of your computer, but the prospect of being denied a networking opportunity from an individual is very demoralizing to many."

Larry Keim is a nationally recognized authority on career counseling and career management. A resident of south Texas, Keim advises and assists career counseling firms throughout the U.S.

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Larry Keim

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