It's Official: Motorbikes are Now Quicker than Cars a Recent Research Shows

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A recent event in Edinburgh found that two wheels are an improved way to commute, beating four-wheelers into submission. As part of European mobility Week, TryCycling and Changing Pace set up a timed affair in which a number of individuals either cycled, drove or used a motorbike to get around the Scottish capital's streets.

Today's roads are crammed with vehicles. Traffic jams are a familiar sight on modern British highways. Horns beeping, tired, angry drivers. The car is a great way to get around, yet if everyone tries to get to the same place at once, there are bound to be problems, aren't there? City streets full of those who just want to get home or get to work, but always held up by that pointless jam. And in a world that increasingly requires us to be in two places at once, people are being stretched to the limit, rushed to fit all appointments in.

Briton's roads are clogged to the limit. Recent findings from the RAC Foundation suggested that each commuter will travel around the world two-and-a-half times during their lifetimes, reports Motortorque.com. Moreover, 25 million people in the UK travel from one place to another to get into their places of work each day, it said. Of all commuters, just a miniscule one per cent ride in on a motorbike. "We need to plan for the diverse eighteen million car journeys that are made everyday, but we also need to be smarter about how we encourage people to reduce their car use," said the executive director of the RAC Foundation, Edmund King.

However, there may be an alternative. A recent event in Edinburgh found that two wheels are an improved way to commute, beating four-wheelers into submission. As part of European mobility Week, TryCycling and Changing Pace set up a timed affair in which a number of individuals either cycled, drove or used a motorbike to get around the Scottish capital's streets, reports the Edinburgh Evening News. And motorbikes were one of the most viable ways to get from A to B, the results showed. Commuters travelling from Ingliston Park and Ride and Ocean Terminal into the city centre did so quickest on bikes, organisers stated.

Cars fared less well in the speed event, with it taking 43 minutes to drive the 5.3 miles from Newcraighill station into the city. "The event highlights the alternative methods people can use to get into work of a morning and the success of the cyclists shows just how bike-friendly a city Edinburgh is," stated the transport leader in Edinburgh and councillor Phil Wheeler. Co-ordinator for both of the organisers Maggie Wynn also said that she was pleased by the ability of the drivers that entered the competition. With findings such as these, the evidence is there to suggest that those old, stuffy cars can be ditched, in favour of a quicker mode of transport that looks to leave behind those unnecessary jams.

Motorcyclists may want to be reminded, though, that a good bike insurance plan is highly recommended, so that all angles are covered. While - as proven - riding a motorcycle cuts down on those frustrating traffic queues, commuters may be back in the mire if unable to ride for any reason. A viable motorbike insurance scheme could just be the final piece of the jigsaw for those who firmly want to zoom into the sunset.

If the streets of Edinburgh are anything to go by, then a whole new era of two-wheeled commuters can become a reality, cutting and slicing between those stationary four-wheelers.

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