BUILDER Magazine's October Issue Highlights the Green Aspects of the 2007 Builder's Choice Winners and Offers a Forecast for the Future of the Housing Industry.

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The winning element in the Builder's Choice award competition this year was a focus on energy-efficient, sustainable design and production practices.

Builder's Choice

However the American home buying public responds to the daily news, though, builders must continue to keep their eyes on the numbers. Sales, starts, inventory, prices -- economic forecasts of these and other metrics are crucial in determining how to best conduct their business.

Green building and the housing recession are perhaps the two most important topics in home building industry conversation in this tumultuous market, and as a leading voice in the industry, BUILDER addresses both topics in its October issue. This month marks BUILDER's 27th annual Builder's Choice Design and Planning Awards competition for the best-designed housing in the United States. All of the winning projects are on display in the October cover story, and many of them feature green and sustainable site planning, construction techniques, and products.

The Builder's Choice feature also reveals 10 new market trends, many stemming from energy-efficient, sustainable design and production practices. Some builders, for example, preserve architectural history while conserving resources; others start from scratch to create walkable communities, cutting down on residents' reliance on automobiles. But green building is not a trend, says Senior Editor Nigel Maynard.

"Green building is here to stay. Over time, I think green building methods will become an essential part of home construction because the more consumers learn about green building, the more they'll demand green building features in their homes," Maynard says. "While some green practices require more investment, many are cost-effective for both builders and buyers."

BUILDER's third installment of "Nobody's Home" queries 12 industry experts about the current housing recession and when they expect the downturn to end. The conclusion of this three-part series takes a look at where the market stands now, what factors will influence its direction, and where it is likely to end up.

"Customer perception seems to be playing a large role in the current housing recession," says Builder's Editor in Chief Denise Dersin. "However the American home buying public responds to the daily news, though, builders must continue to keep their eyes on the numbers. Sales, starts, inventory, prices -- economic forecasts of these and other metrics are crucial in determining how to best conduct their business."

Find articles on green building, the housing recession, and the winners of this year's Builder's Choice awards in BUILDER's October issue. For more BUILDER features, past BUILDER issues, and breaking news from the housing industry, visit http://www.BuilderOnline.com.

About Hanley Wood:
Hanley Wood, LLC, is the premier media and information company serving housing and construction. Through four operating divisions, the company produces award-winning magazines and Web sites, marquee trade shows and events, rich data and custom marketing solutions. The company also is North America's leading publisher of home plans. Hanley Wood Business Media (Washington, D.C.), publishes 36 award-winning residential and commercial construction titles, including BUILDER, REMODELING, CUSTOM HOME, CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION and residential architect. Hanley Wood Business Media also offers the construction industry's foremost collection of Web sites, including BUILDER ONLINE, REMODELING ONLINE, and ebuild, the comprehensive online guide to building products, as well as the largest collection of house plans online through eplans.com and Dream Home Source.

Founded in 1976, Hanley Wood is a $250 million company owned by affiliates of JPMorgan Partners, LLC. CCMP Capital Advisors manages the Hanley Wood investment for JPMorgan Partners.

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