Survey of Israeli Scientists Finds Strong Connection Between Creativity and Spirituality

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A survey of Israeli scientists, which explored their personal relationship to the creative process, indicated a high correlation between spirituality and creativity. Over 60% of the respondents expressed a strong belief that they had "experienced creativity as a spiritual process." The survey, the first of its kind in Israel and possibly the world, was commissioned by the Project Mind Foundation.

We now have firm evidence that not only do many scientists associate creativity with spirituality but that some are even willing to assume the risks of experimenting with extreme creative intensity. It will be interesting to see how scientists in other countries compare.

A recent survey of Israeli scientists, which explored their personal relationship to the creative process, points to a high correlation between spirituality and creativity. The survey, the first of its kind in Israel -- and possibly the world -- solicited over 3300 scientists in universities and research institutes to probe their perception of the role of creativity in their professional pursuits. Over 60% of the respondents, 237 in number, indicated a strong belief that they had "experienced creativity as a spiritual process."

The survey, conducted by the Israeli pollster TNS Teleseker, was commissioned by the Project Mind Foundation, an international nonprofit organization dedicated to breakthrough methods in creative acceleration of scientific development. It is the first in a series of international surveys on scientists and creativity. According to Project Mind chairman David S. Devor, "Understanding how scientists perceive the creative process will help us better mold environments uniquely suited to nurturing intensified creativity."

When asked to comment on the surroundings most conducive to creativity, a number of respondents described an absence of sensation -- a dark room, being tired, being relieved of all stress, etc. -- as sparking the greatest inspiration.

Some 90% of the scientists reported that they had experienced their most potent strokes of creativity when they were in their 20's. When asked if they would be willing to try a method that would put them in a creative state for as long as they wished, "even if this involved significant psychological and/or physiological risks," over 20% of the respondents indicated some willingness to do so.

These findings are significant, says Project Mind Foundation chairman Devor, because, "We now have firm evidence that not only do many scientists associate creativity with spirituality but that some are even willing to assume the risks of experimenting with extreme creative intensity. It will be interesting to see how scientists in other countries compare."

The Project Mind Foundation was established in 1995 and has 60 founding associates in 15 countries across the world.

For further information and complete survey results, contact David S. Devor, http://www.projectmind.org.

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David Devor

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