The Biking Revolution Hit the Streets Dressed in Costumes in a Midwest College Town

Share Article

The Biking Revolution hit the streets in style. Despite rain, there were between sixty five and seventy happy cyclists who showed up for Kirksville's first Halloween Costume Critical Mass bike ride, with about 50% of riders in costume.

Past News Releases

RSS

The Biking Revolution hit the streets in style on October 26th, 2007. Despite rain, there were between sixty five and seventy happy cyclists who showed up for Kirksville's first Halloween Costume Critical Mass bike ride, with about 50% of riders in costume. This is a large turn out for many Critical Mass rides, but is especially big for Kirksville, a Midwest college town of only about 18,000 people. Among those participating on the ride were a mass of college kids, small children, high school BMXers, a roller blader, and even a dog in a basket. In fact, several people came from as far as 30 miles to participate in the ride and there were four media coverage reps: The Kirksville Daily Express, the Edge web cast (in costume), KTVO news, and a documentary camera man!

The monthly ride, which started in Kirksville last spring and happens the last Friday of every month at 5:30, has grown quickly. This growth is in large part due to college students who are passing out Biking Revolution Bracelets, made from used bike inner tubes. They have been passing out the bracelets to raise awareness about the new Kirksville Bike Co-op that's just formed, the Critical Mass rides, and to support bike culture in general.

If you've never heard of Critical Mass you'll be interested to note that it is part of a Biking Revolution that's sweeping the planet as more and more people are getting out of their cars and getting on bikes. In fact, Critical Mass rides have taken place in over 200 cities in the U.S. and have happened on every continent except Antarctica.

The people involved in these mass bike rides participate for a variety of reasons; a short and nowhere near complete list of some of them is included below:

  • care about the environment
  • to raise awareness about fossil fuel use
  • to support cyclists rights
  • to reduce resource wars
  • just to have a lot of fun

So, if you feel inclined to join the Biking Revolution, make yourself a Biking Revolution Bracelet out of a piece of used bike inner tube and tie it around your wrist and find other revolutionaries by searching for "The Biking Revolution" on FaceBook.com. Otherwise, keep a look out on the last Friday of every month for a happy horde of cyclists biking through your town, many of whom may be passing out flowers to onlookers to spread goodwill, cheer and The Biking Revolution.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Nathan Brown

660-883-5585
Email >