Seattle Blogger and Breast Cancer Activist Fights Pink Ribbons with Humor

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The Assertive Cancer Patient Announces Winners in the First Annual "How LOW Will Komen GO?" Contest Local blogger and cancer patient Jeanne Sather has announced the winners in a contest she hopes will show just how absurd pink ribbon cause marketing, as practiced by the Komen Foundation, has become.

Local blogger and cancer patient Jeanne Sather has announced the winners in a contest she hopes will show just how absurd pink ribbon cause marketing, as practiced by the Komen Foundation, has become.

Entries in the contest have been posted to Sather's blog, The Assertive Cancer Patient (http://www.assertivepatient.com) during the month of October, Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Entries, all pink-ribbon products claiming to donate a share of their profits to Komen, included pink-ribbon English muffins, pink M&Ms, pink boxer shorts (which one Arizona sheriff was reportedly requiring all inmates of his jail to wear), pink wedding gowns, and more.

The winners are:

Grand Prize: to the blogger Dubutant, for her entry: Jingle Jugs for Life

Jingle Jugs sells life-size boobs, or "racks," that bounce in time to the song "Titties and Beer." Its market? Frat boys.

From the Jingle Jugs Web site: "Our newest version of Jingle Jugs comes with a pre-recorded breast cancer message. A second re-recordable chip allows the user to record a message of his or her own choice, such as a favorite song, your favorite team's fight song, a romantic message, a political commentary . . . all to which the Jugs will dance and move in synch." (http://www.jinglejugsforlife.com/)

Debutaunt's comment, in a letter to Komen: "... Honestly, I can't see in any good conscience how you can justify accepting money from this vulgar company. They sell a product that is so putrid and heinous, but are justifying it since they donate a 'percentage' to breast cancer organizations -- then show proudly their giant check to Komen."

First Prize: to a Canadian reader named Nancy for: Pink Wedding Gowns for the Cure

This entry was an editorial feature in "Brides" magazine. ABC News had this quote:
"With this gown sale, we hope to harness the power of the wedding dress -- an icon viewed around the world as a symbol of hope for the future -- to impact the lives of seriously ill women in a positive way," said Millie Martini Bratten, editor in chief of "Brides."

Judge's Choice Award: To the Mars/M&Ms Company for: Pink M&Ms

Sather has been boycotting M&Ms and all Mars candy products for more than a year, because she feels the pink M&Ms trivialize a very serious disease.

This year, she bought several bags of pink M&Ms and made a mosaic titled, "What I See in the Mirror Every Morning (And It Ain't Pretty)." A photo of the mosaic is posted to Sather's blog (See http://www.assertivepatient.com/2007/10/mms-cancer-the-.html).

Sather, who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1998 and is now living with metastatic disease, has been writing about pink topics this month as part of her crusade against turning breast cancer into a marketing gimmick. According to Sather, "I have finally realized why the whole pink ribbon/pink marketing thing makes me so angry: I feel exploited."

Her blog posts this month include "Prostate Cancer Ken," a companion to "Breast Cancer Barbie," a doll released by Mattel last October, and "Benign Girl," who is Breast Cancer Barbie's little sister.

Also as part of her "Boycott October" campaign, Sather has sent free buttons to anyone who asks for one. The button (which is pink) says: "Boycott October," and in smaller type, "Don't buy pink products. Don't exploit women with breast cancer."

Sather most recently made headlines in Canada and the United States, and as far away as China, for her search for a Canadian husband, and the free medical coverage that would come with such a marriage.

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