Radical Sixties Culture, Anti-War/Anti-Establishment Class Warfare Inspire Exhibition Examining Daisy as Peace Icon

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Flower Power: A Subversive Botanical (February 1, 2008--May 11, 2008), an exhibition at the New Mexico Museum of Art, will examine anti-war sentiments, anti-establishment demands, class realignments, gender divisions, and utopian desires associated with the single petal, daisy flower that was an icon of the sixties.

Flower Power: A Subversive Botanical (February 1, 2008--May 11, 2008), an exhibition at the New Mexico Museum of Art (http://www.nmartmuseum.org), will examine anti-war sentiments, anti-establishment demands, class realignments, gender divisions, and utopian desires associated with the single petal, daisy flower that was an icon of the sixties.

Love-ins, the peace movement, anti-establishment protests and happenings all were united and symbolized by this single flower. The icon resonated with people of all classes across the globe and traveled easily between high art and popular culture. Andy Warhol, for example, used it to create prints destined for galleries and museums and MariMekko design group placed it on household goods created to foster egalitarian, modern living.

In recent years, designers have recycled the iconic daisy for adornment on clothing and mass-manufactured goods, and artists have used it for the basis of their art. For example, Takashi Murakami, the Japanese artist/designer, has produced paintings, prints, and consumer products with the daisy as the primary element. The reasons for the revival of the daisy are many, but the flower seems to resurface whenever communal hopes and desires appear to have been abandoned.

The exhibition will do more than draw parallels between the cold war or Vietnam era and today. Rather, it will allow viewers to consider the ways in which the daisy serves as a timeless emblem of cultural questioning and a signifier of social change. To accomplish this, well known 20th century artists such as Betty Hahn, Corita Kent, 11101954SC$Andy Warhol, and the MariMekko design group will be associated with contemporary artists such as Tim Jag, Murakami, Yumi Roth, and Erika Wanenmacher. The relationships created in the exhibition will allow lesser-known contemporary art the opportunity to be in visual dialogue with better known works.

In the exhibition spaces, Corita Kent's anti-war prints will be seen in relation to Erika Wanenmacher's painting/sculpture of the bombing of Baghdad in which the plumes of smoke have been symbolized with three-dimensional, painted daisies. Relationships will be established between fabrics produced by the MariMekko design group with the one hundred porcelain daisies by Yumi Roth that can be installed in any space to provide decorative enhancement. Tim Jag's painting/sculpture installation of daisies will be linked with Andy Warhol's prints to highlight ideas of repetition, abundance, consumption and design.

Warm sentiments and radical desires will be at the heart of this lush exhibition.            

Flower Power: A Subversive Botanical was co-curated by Tim Rodgers and Merry Scully, New Mexico Museum of Art.

Media Contacts:
Tim Rodgers, Chief Curator
505-476-5058
tim.rodgers @ state.nm.us

Merry Scully, Curator, Governor's Gallery
505-476-2289
merry.scully @ state.nm.us

Steve Cantrell, PR Manager
505-476-1144
505-310-3539 - cell
steve.cantrell @ state.nm.us

The New Mexico Museum of Art was founded in 1917 as the Art Gallery of the Museum of New Mexico. Housed in a spectacular Pueblo Revival building designed by I. H. and William M. Rapp, it was based on their New Mexico building at the Panama-California Exposition (1915). The museum's architecture inaugurated what has come to be known as "Santa Fe Style." For more than 90 years, the Museum has collected and exhibited work by leading artists from New Mexico and elsewhere. This tradition continues today with a wide-array of exhibitions with work from the world's leading artists. The New Mexico Museum of Art strives to bring the art of New Mexico to the world and the art of the world to New Mexico.

The New Mexico Museum of Art is a division of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs.

Information for the Public

Location: Santa Fe's Plaza at 107 West Palace Avenue.

Information: 505-476-5072 or http://www.nmartmuseum.org

Days/Times: Tuesday through Sunday, 10:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M. Open Free on Fridays, 5:00-8:00 P.M., with the exception of major exhibition openings.

Admission: School groups free. Children 16 and under free. New Mexico residents with ID free on Sundays. New Mexico resident Senior Citizens (age 60+) with ID free Wednesdays. Museum Foundation members free. NM Veterans with 50% or greater disability free. Students with ID $1 discount. Single visit to one museum: $8.00 for non-state residents, $6.00 for New Mexico residents. Four-day pass to five museums including state-run museums in Santa Fe plus The Museum of Spanish Colonial Art $18.00. One-day pass for two museums (Museum of International Folk Art and Museum of Indian Arts and Culture OR New Mexico Museum of Art and Palace of the Governors) $12.00. Group rate for ten or more people: single visit $6.00, four-day pass $16.00.

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