Latest Supply Chain Research Suggests Carbon Labeling Should Now be on Everyone's Radar

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Increasing pressure to comply with environmental regulations will impact supply chain professionals as measures such as carbon labeling become required.

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The supply chain is an integral part of these labeling systems, because it is here where much of the basic information carried on labels is gleaned. Research is under way to find a robust methodology for defining this information. Supply chain leaders need to keep abreast of this work and understand the intricacies of carbon labeling before their products come under the microscope.

The latest edition of MIT's Supply Chain Strategy newsletter, developed by the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics, suggests that companies should be preparing for carbon labeling. In response to the green trend of environmental responsibility, companies may soon be required to show consumers how much carbon their products have generated.

Edgar E. Blanco and Anthony J. Craig, writing for the MIT SCS newsletter, believe "The supply chain is an integral part of these labeling systems, because it is here where much of the basic information carried on labels is gleaned. Research is under way to find a robust methodology for defining this information. Supply chain leaders need to keep abreast of this work and understand the intricacies of carbon labeling before their products come under the microscope."

Blanco and Craig also suggest that while there are some difficult issues that need to be resolved before such carbon labels are required, supply chain professionals should become aware of the possible implications because they will play a key role in the development of carbon labeling systems.

The latest SCS issue also educates supply chain executives on a variety of other issues. Articles include:

Step One to Successful Outsourcing: Strategy Alignment - Outsourcing to a low-cost country is one of the most well-documented supply chain strategies implemented by companies over recent years, yet many enterprises still take this momentous step without considering all the ramifications.

Supply Chains That Capture the Value of ERP - Many companies choose to invest in an ERP system to improve the management of their businesses, however, while the technology undoubtedly delivers big efficiencies, it can be blunted by its very popularity.

(Re)searching for Answers: Five Steps to Your Procurement Peak -Is your procurement organization stuck in a transactional rut or reaching for the kind of supply wins that deliver competitive advantage and millions of dollars in cost savings? Knowing where your organization is positioned on procurement's evolutionary scale helps you to understand what supply chain efficiencies are being left on the table and how you can push to the next level.

Those interested in learning more about SCS and its latest newsletter content may visit: http://www.ioma.com/issues/SCS or http://www.MITSupplyChainStrategy.com.

About MIT Supply Chain Strategy:
MIT Supply Chain Strategy is an independent newsletter published by IOMA with the mission to drive competitive advantage by linking corporate strategy and supply chain management. Its 10 issues each year shepherd senior executives from a broad cross section of industries and corporate disciplines through developing a strategy that defines how their supply chain should support and reinforce the company's strategic goals.

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Randy Cochran

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