Fight Abuse Victim Pit Bulls Find Friends with BAD RAP

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Abuse victims overcome bad pasts and start news lives as cherished family pets with a little help from pit bull friends and advocates, BAD RAP - Bay Area Doglovers Responsible About Pit bulls. BAD RAP was recommended by Valparaiso University School of Law Professor Rebecca Huss as one of the groups to receive pit bulls seized from the Michael Vick property.

She's a very relaxed and mellow dog who has bursts of happiness and excitement. She's loving little thing ...not bothered by other dogs, she can take them or leave them. But she needs her people fix, that is pretty obvious!

2007 was a good year for some lucky pit bulls in Oakland CA. Dogs 'Lil'Bit,' 'Sophie,' 'Millie' and 'Gabby' will each be enjoying new lives with loving families this holiday thanks to friends in BAD RAP - Bay Area Doglovers Responsible About Pit bulls. Once set up by (different) abusive owners to fight other dogs, the four females were recently matched to caring families after graduating from a unique foster care program that rescues good hearted dogs from bad situations.

Each of the dogs lived with trained volunteers while learning good house manners, attending Pit Ed training classes and healing from a life of cruelty and neglect. Three of the dogs are now enjoying dog playmates and one earned her AKC Canine Good Citizen certification while waiting to be adopted.

Joe and Debbie Clifford adopted Little Bit, a pretty little brown pit bull who came into Oakland Animal Care Services with the telltale signs of having been bred and fought. All that's behind her now. Joe says, "She's a very relaxed and mellow dog who has bursts of happiness and excitement. She's loving little thing ...not bothered by other dogs, she can take them or leave them. But she needs her people fix, that is pretty obvious!" Lil'Bit shares her new home with a pit-mix male named Theo.

BAD RAP co-founder Tim Racer, a member of the team of experts assembled to evaluate the Vick dogs, explained how abuse cases can rally: "Dogs are such individuals. This breed in particular tends to be highly motivated to please its people. By offering structure, stability, leadership and opportunities to succeed, we can give these guys the chance to adjust to life as normal family pets. Not every dog can overcome its abuse, but our goal is to identify and help the ones that can. Some of our best pit bull ambassadors have come from the worst imaginable backgrounds and were more than happy to leave their pasts behind them."

Ten pit bulls from the Bad Newz Kennels will have the same opportunity in BAD RAP's foster care program if Judge Hudson okays the recommendations made by Valparaiso University School of Law Professor Rebecca J. Huss, the court appointed Guardian/Special Master of the Vick dogs. BAD RAP participated in the initial evaluation of the dogs as part of the ASPCA led team and later, Tim Racer returned to VA to accompany Miss Huss in re-assessing the dogs and aid in decisions for placement with eight qualified organizations.

Donna Reynolds, Executive Director of BAD RAP states, "Whether they come from a famous celebrity or an unknown abuser in West Oakland, victimized pit bulls deserve the same consideration as other breeds: A chance to be treated humanely, comforted, and viewed as individuals. The fact that they've seen the dark side of humanity does not give us license to exclude them from our circle of compassion."

The full stories of the rescue and recovery of Lil'Bit, Sophie, Millie and Gabby can be viewed on BAD RAP's website: http://www.BADRAP.org.

The mission of BAD RAP is to secure the future of the American Pit Bull Terrier as a cherished family companion.

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Donna Reynolds
BAD RAP
510-414-6461
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