Dr. Speron Agrees That Breastfeeding Does Not Create Sagging Breasts

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While the benefits of breastfeeding are unquestionable, many new mothers choose not to for fear of getting sagging breasts at some point in the future. However, according to a study recently released, breastfeeding alone has no impact on a woman's breast shape. Dr. Speron agrees that breastfeeding does not create sagging breasts.

Yes, it's true -- breastfeeding does not create sagging breasts.

While the benefits of breastfeeding are unquestionable, many new mothers choose not to for fear of getting sagging breasts at some point in the future. However, according to a study recently released, breastfeeding alone has no impact on a woman's breast shape. Dr. Speron agrees that breastfeeding does not create sagging breasts.

"There has been an explosion of breast augmentation and breast lifting procedures in the last few years," says Dr. Sam Speron, plastic surgery expert and consumer advocate. "Many women who come in for corrective breast surgery complaining of saggy or less full breasts believe they are like this because they breastfed their children. Although the amount of sagging in the breasts has been proven to increase with each pregnancy, this study showed that breastfeeding does not worsen sagging. Some women may have been reluctant to breastfeed because of this urban legend that doing so means the end of youthful, perky breasts! Expectant mothers can now relax knowing that the act of breastfeeding does not in and of itself change the appearance of their breasts."

The study examined 93 women who were pregnant one or more times prior to having cosmetic breast surgery. Fifty-eight percent of patients reported breastfeeding one or more of their children. The duration of breastfeeding ranged from 2 to 25 months, with an average of nine months. Fifty-five percent of respondents reported an adverse change in the shape of their breasts following pregnancy.

As the first study to examine what impacts breast shape in connection to pregnancy, plastic surgeons found that a history of breastfeeding, the number of children breastfed, the duration of each child's breastfeeding or the amount of weight gained during pregnancy were actually not significant predictors for losing breast shape. However, the body mass index (BMI), number of pregnancies, larger pre-pregnancy bra size, a smoking history and age were all significant risk factors for an increased degree of breast sagging.

Over 103,000 women had breast lifts in 2006, up 96 percent since 2000, according to the ASPS. In addition, more than 329,000 women had breast augmentation, easily making it the top female surgical cosmetic procedure in 2006.

Breast milk provides many health benefits to infants. Research has shown breastfed infants have improved general health, growth and development as well as a lower risk of many acute and chronic illnesses than are their bottle-fed infant counterparts.

Dr Speron has been actively sharing this exciting revelation with his patients. Dr. Speron is the founder and medical director of the Park Ridge Center for Plastic Surgery. He is board certified with the American Board of Plastic Surgery and an active member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

For more information, please visit our web site at http://www.drsperonplasticsurgery.com or http://www.prplastic.com.

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