Anna Nicole Smith: The Road Not Taken; Author/Expert on Women's Issues--She Turned Playboy Down--Goes Behind the Story

Urging girls and women to reflect on the personal nature and tragedy of Anna Nicole Smith's struggle, author/expert Dr. Maureen Mack offers specific guidance on mother-daughter attachment, female defined sexuality and sensuality, models and mentors, the ways society silences young women, and much more.

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail a friend
And the horrifying truth is that we don't want these celebrities to take a break and heal. We actually make fun of celebrities who seek out Kabala or Scientology to find peace without drugs or alcohol at the same time we show sympathy for someone who uses rehab to hold on to a movie contract.

Eau Claire, WI (PRWEB) February 9, 2007

"What kind of life, and death, can you expect to have when your enduring life role model is Marilyn Monroe?" asks Dr. Maureen D. Mack, author of Finding Center: Strategies to Build Strong Girls & Women and professor of education and women's studies at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. Mack, an attractive woman whose difficult childhood could have led to an outcome far different from a Ph.D., decided to turn down an offer to pose for Playboy when she was 20 years old.

Urging girls and women to reflect on the personal nature and tragedy of Anna Nicole Smith's struggle, Dr. Mack offers specific guidance on mother-daughter attachment, female defined sexuality and sensuality, models and mentors, the ways society silences young women, and much more. "The truth is that Anna Nicole was a beautiful teen and a gorgeous woman who overtime learned that her total assets were her external beauty. Today, in a sexually drenched man-dominated media, women and, yes young girls, are primarily portrayed and valued for their legs, mouths, voluptuous breasts and visual ability to arouse men. Women do need to take back their power with respect to defining and portraying what their sensual and sexual lives are rather than allowing mainstream for-profit-media inform them and others who they are and what their value is based upon."

She also comments on the current fad of young celebrities attempting to remediate their profile by ducking into rehab: "The notion that a young woman can heal in two weeks without growing a strong girl-woman pack around her to counsel and protect her is absurd, " notes Mack. "And the horrifying truth is that we don't want these celebrities to take a break and heal. We actually make fun of celebrities who seek out Kabala or Scientology to find peace without drugs or alcohol at the same time we show sympathy for someone who uses rehab to hold on to a movie contract."

About the Author

Maureen D. Mack is a professor of teacher education and women's studies at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. She authored and teaches Education of Girls and Women in the United States. Working extensively with teachers and students, Dr. Mack has published articles and videotape productions, is a keynote speaker and consultant on issue of youth at risk and women's issues.

###


Contact