Latest AHA Stats Out: Cholesterol Still Too High

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The latest American Heart Association Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics -- 2008 Update is out. Almost half of the adult population (48.4%) in the U.S. has a total cholesterol level that puts them at risk for heart disease (the leading cause of death among American men and women).

The latest American Heart Association Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics -- 2008 Update is out. Although the average cholesterol level has dropped, Americans still have some work to do. According to the latest stats, almost half of the adult population (48.4%) has a total cholesterol level that puts them at risk for heart disease (the leading cause of death among American men and women). What's more, one in three adult Americans (over 80 million people) has an LDL or "bad" cholesterol level (the most established risk factor for heart disease) ≥ 130mg/dL. The AHA describes an LDL cholesterol level of less than 100 mg/dL as "optimal" for the prevention of heart disease.

Statins (powerful cholesterol-lowering drugs) are a therapeutic option for many people, but like all drugs, have side effects -- so are not for everyone. Diet and lifestyle should be the first line of defense against dangerous high cholesterol. LDL or "bad" cholesterol can be significantly lowered by lifestyle change. According to Dr. Janet Brill, cardiovascular nutritionist and author of the best-selling book Cholesterol Down: 10 simple steps to lower your cholesterol in 4 weeks--without prescription drugs (Three River Press, $13.95), "Americans need to know that cardiovascular disease will take the lives of almost 1 million Americans this year. The real tragedy is that many of these deaths could be prevented through simple lifestyle changes, namely diet and exercise."

Lower cholesterol in 2008 -- without drugs. "Cholesterol DOWN," a best-selling book that provides a clear, practical, drug-free approach to cholesterol-lowering in a research-based book.
Cholesterol Down is the safe and effective alternative (or adjunct) to statin drugs.

For more information, visit http://www.CholesterolDownBook.com.

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