'Texas, the Confederate War Machine' Continues the American Civil War in the West Series at OldWestNewWest.Com

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Sending 90,000 Texans to fight at eastern battles, providing the South with guns and war material, and growing tons of cotton to help pay for it all are just some of facets of the story 'Texas, the Confederate War Machine' in the January issue of OldWestNewWest.Com.

Sending 90,000 Texans to fight at eastern battles, providing the South with guns and war material, and growing tons of cotton to help pay for it all are just some of facets of the story 'Texas, the Confederate War Machine' in the January issue of OldWestNewWest.Com (http://www.oldwestnewwest.com).

'Texas, the Confederate War Machine' is the latest installment in the eZine's American Civil War in the West series, a continuing look at how the Civil War reached into the states and territories west of the Mississippi River.

"At the start of the Civil War Texas was both one of the original seven Southern states to secede, and a rough and tumble frontier that was still fighting Indians," said Mike Harris, OldWestNewWest.Com editor. "Because it was so far west, Texas was relatively free from fighting Union forces, and was able to rally thousands of troops, manufacture war material and grow cotton to help the Confederacy pay for the war.

"Texas also gave the South something else," Harris said, "and that was border access to Mexico. Texas cotton could go to international markets, foreign war supplies could come into the South via Texas, all relatively free from the Union blockade of Gulf ports."

Although there were several battles along the Texas coast, and Union forces temporarily occupied some coastal areas, federal forces were never able to launch a major invasion of Texas.

"Texas also holds the distinction of being the site of the last battle of the Civil War," Harris said. "The Battle of Palmito Ranch near the southern tip of the state was a small Confederate victory, but it came after Gen. Robert E. Lee had surrendered. After the news of the surrender finally reached the Confederacy's Trans-Mississippi Department, all fighting ceased."

The January issue of OldWestNewWest.Com also includes features on the upcoming 10th annual Gathering of the Gunfighters festival Jan. 12-13 at Yuma Arizona, the ongoing struggle between Indian culture and commercial development near Bear Butte, South Dakota, a profile of James Lighthizer, president of the Civil War Preservation Trust and the group's efforts to preserve Civil War battlefields, and an early look at this year's Cowboy Festival at Santa Clarita, California.

About OldWestNewWest.Com
OldWestNewWest.Com, the Internet eZine that showcases how the New West celebrates America's Old West, is published by Cheyenne, Wyoming-based La Frontera Publishing, publisher of historic fiction and non-fiction books about the American West. Its Web site can be found at http://www.lafronterapublishing.com and reached at (307) 778-4752. LFP's eZine, OldWestNewWest.Com, can be found at http://www.oldwestnewwest.com

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MIKE HARRIS

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