Air Crashes and Wave Interference on Fly-by-wire Airplanes; Author's Book Describes Frequency-based Weapons and Defense Systems that Are Totally Wireless

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This week a British Airways Boeing 777 made a crunching touchdown short of the runway on Thursday, ripping off the plane's landing gear and severely damaging the two engines and wings. Nineteen injuries were reported among the 152 people aboard. Since it is unclear what caused the engine computers to malfunction, the author of "Worse Than Global Warming: Wave Technology" suggests that possibly interference from unscheduled frequencies could have influenced the airplane's "brain.

This week according to a preliminary accident report, the engines on a British Airways plane that crash-landed at London's Heathrow airport failed to respond for a demand to increase thrust about two miles before it reached the runway. The British Airways Boeing 777 made a crunching touchdown short of the runway on Thursday, ripping off the plane's landing gear and severely damaging the two engines and wings. Nineteen injuries were reported among the 152 people aboard.

Since it is unclear what caused the engine computers to malfunction, the author of "Worse Than Global Warming: Wave Technology" suggests that possibly interference from unscheduled frequencies could have influenced the airplane's "brain." As a jet pilot and researcher of the potential influence that atmospheric frequency saturation could have, Nina Anderson raises the question for investigators to consider the potential of wave interference. Wireless technology is rampant in our world and the unseen hazards from this technology can influence our health, behavior and maybe aircraft controls. She asked the question of one major aircraft manufacturer of fly-by-wire aircraft (where signals replace mechanical or hydraulic actuators of control surfaces and engine operation) if shielding has been upgraded to account for the increase in frequency ranges from our growing wireless world. They didn't have an answer.

As she has found, weapons are no match for ground based frequency manipulation. Reconnaissance aircraft of today are in many cases just large remote controlled toys. If terrorists can hack into government databases, wouldn't they be able to develop a hand held frequency-jammer that could influence the computer boxes on an airplane? In her book she describes many frequency-based weapons and defense systems that are totally wireless. When all these frequencies merge what happens? If we make a correlation to the introduction of a new drug and find years later, that if used with other drugs it can create harmful side effects, do we really know what kind of anomalies we may be triggering when multiple frequencies try to coexist?

From the danger of EMP weapons disabling anything electrical to ionospheric heaters manipulating radio wave trajectories, we have entered into a potentially unstable scientific arena. If laser beams from a pocket flashlight can temporarily blind a pilot, what is to say that a remote control device couldn't change the message from the cockpit sending-unit to the control or engine computer boxes. Many pilots at times have seen an airplane develop its own agenda. If that airplane is a fly-by-wire machine, it is plausible that something caused the interference, be it atmospheric turbulence, thunderstorm activity, static electricity or quite possibly a rogue frequency. It is time to look at frequency saturation and its potential for disaster before its too late.

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NINA ANDERSON

Tracy Brabender
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