Alliance for Sustainable Colorado Earns the Energy Star for Superior Energy Efficiency

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Organization's Alliance Center recognized for super-efficient operations and environmental protection. The Alliance Center, owned and managed by the Alliance for Sustainable Colorado, has earned the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) prestigious Energy Star, the national symbol for superior energy efficiency and environmental protection. Commercial buildings and industrial plants that rate in the top 25 percent of facilities in the nation for energy efficiency may qualify for the Energy Star.

The Alliance Center, owned and managed by the Alliance for Sustainable Colorado (http://www.allianceforcolorado.org), has earned the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) prestigious Energy Star, the national symbol for superior energy efficiency and environmental protection. Commercial buildings and industrial plants that rate in the top 25 percent of facilities in the nation for energy efficiency may qualify for the Energy Star.

"We are thrilled to accept EPA's Energy Star in recognition of our energy efficiency efforts," said Jeanne Beaudry, executive director of the Alliance for Sustainable Colorado. "Through this achievement, we have demonstrated our commitment to environmental stewardship while also lowering our energy costs."

The Alliance Center is a "Multi-Tenant Nonprofit Center" that provides office and meeting space to 30 nonprofit organizations. The Alliance Center houses groups that advocate for development of policies and implementation of practices of sustainability.

An historic building built in 1908; The Alliance Center is an example of preservation and conservation that maintains historic integrity while adding "green" features. Under the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED (Leadership for Energy and Environmental Design) program, The Alliance Center is one of only two buildings to earn two certifications: Existing Building (EB) Gold and Commercial Interiors (CI) Silver.

After energy efficiency, the Alliance Center saw significant performance improvements, reducing CO2 emissions by 80,000 pounds per year and cutting energy costs by 12 cents per square foot. "This is positive proof that energy efficiency is all about saving money and saving the environment," said Ms. Beaudry.

Buildings that earn the Energy Star use an average of 35 percent less energy than typical buildings and also release 35 percent less carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. According to the EPA, the Alliance Center energy bills are 39% less than the industry average. The Alliance for Sustainable Colorado took several steps to cut its energy use including halving its energy use from lighting by using new T-8 lamps, high efficiency electronic and daylight-harvesting ballasts, as well as light sensors and motion detectors. In addition, a new energy efficiency management system segments energy use by time of day and specific location, further helping to trim electrical consumption.

"Whether you are running a grocery store, a school, or an office building, getting the most out of your energy dollars - while reducing your carbon footprint - just makes sense," said EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson.

About The Alliance for a Sustainable Colorado:
The Alliance for Sustainable Colorado (http://www.allianceforcolorado.org), a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, was founded in 2004 to advance sustainable policies in Colorado for present and future generations. The organization creates the vital links that build collaboration and coalitions among nonprofit organizations, socially responsible businesses, local government agencies and academia. The Alliance for Sustainable Colorado owns the Alliance Center, one of the "greenest" buildings in the United States, with LEED Gold certification for Existing Buildings and LEED Silver certification for Commercial Interiors. The Center provides office and meeting space to 30 nonprofit organizations that advocate for policies and programs that support sustainability.

EPA's national energy performance rating system provides a 1-100 scale that helps organizations assess how efficiently their buildings use energy relative to similar buildings nationwide. A building that scores a rating of 75 or higher is eligible for the ENERGY STAR. Commercial Buildings that can earn the ENERGY STAR include offices, bank branches, financial centers, retailers, courthouses, hospitals, hotels, K-12 schools, medical offices, supermarkets, dormitories, and warehouses.

Energy Star was introduced by EPA in 1992 as a voluntary, market-based partnership to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency. Today, the Energy Star label can be found on more than 50 different kinds of products, new homes and commercial and industrial buildings. Products and buildings that have earned the Energy Star designation prevent greenhouse gas emissions by meeting strict energy-efficiency specifications set by the government. In 2006, Americans, with the help of Energy Star, saved about $14 billion on their energy bills while reducing the greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to those of 25 million vehicles.

For more information about Energy Star visit http://www.energystar.gov.

*To calculate greenhouse gas emissions, please visit http://www.usctcgateway.net/tool/

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