The American Immigrants George W. Bush to Barack Obama

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Immigration is one of the most debated and central issues of Campaign 2008. Opinions on how to cope with the influx of illegal aliens into the United States ranges from vigilante justice on the conservative side to empathy on the liberal side. President George W. Bush, Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, John McCain and Mike Huckabee all have different views on how to handle the immigration problem.

The 2008 Presidential Campaign features candidates with many varied national origins.

John McCain's ancestors were Scot-English and fought in the Revolutionary War. Mike Huckabee's ancestors emigrated from England. Barack Obama's mother, Ann Dunham was born in Kansas and his father's family is from Kenya.

Immigration is one of the most debated and central issues of Campaign 2008. Opinions on how to cope with the influx of illegal aliens into the United States ranges from vigilante justice on the conservative side to empathy on the liberal side. President George W. Bush, Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, John McCain and Mike Huckabee all have different views on how to handle the immigration problem.

All of the candidates for President of the United States are descendants of immigrants. George W. Bush probably has the noblest pedigree with ancestry back to the Mayflower and to the English royal family. Hillary Clinton's ancestors were coal miners. "John McCain's ancestors were Scot-English and fought in the Revolutionary War. Mike Huckabee's ancestors emigrated from England. Barack Obama's mother, Ann Dunham was born in Kansas and his father's family is from Kenya." Barack's father was awarded a Ph.D. degree and served as the senior economist in the Kenyan Ministry of Finance.

Immigration to the United States has primarily been by sea, except for immigration from North, Central and South America. The laws of the United States governing shipping are commonly referred to as the Jones Act. Because the Jones Act regulates United States shipping it also regulates passengers of United States ships, including immigrants from foreign countries.

"United States shipping laws, maritime law, and Jones Act law have played a major role in American immigration," according to Jones Act lawyer Bill Ogletree who is a senior partner in the Ogletree Abbott Law Firm in Houston, Texas. The Jones Act is the common name for the Merchant Marine Act of 1920. The stated purpose of the Act is to promote a healthy U.S. Flag fleet and protect that fleet from unfair foreign competition.

The Jones Act specifies that cargo being moved between U.S. ports must be carried in a vessel that was built in the United States and is owned by American citizens or corporations. Since the Jones Act vessels are registered in the United States, our labor and immigration laws require that crewmembers be American citizens or legal aliens.

The Jones Act covers seamen and other maritime workers and includes workers on Offshore Oil Rigs, Stationary Production Rigs, Tug Boats, Barges, Cruise Ships, Private Yachts, Charter Boats, Riverboat Casinos, Shrimp Boats, Fishing Boats, Trawlers, Tankers, Crew Boats, Ferries, Water Taxis, and any other vessels on waters classified as "navigable" which includes intra-coastal waterways, rivers, canals, lakes and bays. Divers and underwater personnel can also be covered by the Jones Act.

The Ogletree Abbott Law Firm represents injured maritime workers across the globe. Jones Act lawyers are the cornerstones for justice for American seamen or other seamen working on U. S. flagged vessels. Mr. Ogletree is the author of the new book titled Jones Act -- Maritime Law for the Injured Worker, which is available online at Amazon.com.

More information is available. The Ogletree Abbott Law Firm's website is located at OgletreeAbbott.com and their maritime website is located at 1800JonesAct.com.

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William Ogletree
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