Barry Layne Says Baby Boomers Must Revitalize Their Resumes to be Competitive in 2008

Share Article

Barry Layne, leading career authority know as America's Career Maker, stated that in a recently completed in house study of 2007 older clients, baby boomers were learning that experience can be an asset and an obstacle to job hunting in 2008.

Barry Layne, leading career authority know as America's Career Maker, stated that in a recently completed in house study of 2007 older clients, baby boomers were learning that experience can be an asset and an obstacle to job hunting in 2008.

Creating an effective resume is critical to securing a first introduction to potential employers. The challenge is to overcome prejudices against older workers, demonstrate your expertise and highlight what you offer companies in two pages or less. A resume is an overview of qualifications -- not a life history. The worker over 50 has a tendency to provide too much detail about responsibilities. One to two pages is standard for a resume. An achievement-oriented resume is recommended, because the emphasis is on the skills rather than employment history. Usually this type of resume first list achievements, based on skills you wish to market, with quantifiable results. Select those skills that demonstrate the ability to reduce costs, increase sales or improve the company's overall profitability. The focus should be on developed skills, especially technological ones. Transferable and functional expertise should be emphasized.

Layne says baby boomers should concentrate on one well written resume that targets their immediate job search and revise it to fit the requirements of the open position. If you consistently hear that you are overqualified, or are concerned that you will be perceived as such, then you have not effectively targeted your resume. Avoid listing all the years worked. Employers are focusing on relevant up-dated skills. Include value-added accomplishments, as this will help avoid the misconception that older workers are inflexible.

Traditionally, Barry Layne adds, one of the biggest hurtles older workers faced, was holding onto their jobs or getting new ones. They have higher salaries and often they are the first to be cut.

Employers are now altering their thinking and policies, assures Layne. They will find it desirable to accommodate large numbers of aging members of the baby boomer generation. This generation boasts more college graduates than any other generation in American history, according to the US Department of Education. Over the next 10 years as the average age of the American employee increases, older workers will possess two of the characteristics most prized by employers: experience and affordability.

Barry Layne advises career management consulting firms throughout the US and Canada.

# # #

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Client Care

800-547-5112
Email >