"Helping Children in Crises" Programs Expand

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The US campaigns against childhood illiteracy has received a "helping hand" from the National Association of Police and Lay Charities - the 501(c)3 nationally recognized charity that provides teddy bears to local police departments and fire-fighting stations, across America, to give to traumatized children at disaster scenes.

Teddy Bear Cops Logo

Who would have thought that by Americans donating to our Donate-A-Car Program would have resulted in such a wide-spread, social impact

Late yesterday afternoon (March 5, 2008), NAPLC announced an expansion to their "Helping Children in Crises" programs with a financial assistance plan in the fight against illiteracy among hearing impaired children.

Seven years ago the National Association of Police and Lay Charities (NAPLC) incorporated the well known Teddy Bear Cops™ car donation charity initiative into their "Helping Children in Crises" programs.

Trying to learn to read and write a language they've not heard spoken, deaf children, to date, have had a difficult time attaining literacy. Today, however, with the aid of Sign-Writing (the first written sign language) literacy among young, deaf students has been facilitated, as proven by two quantifying/statistical trial studies (2002 and 2007).

The Sign-Writing Literacy Plan will, also, provide gainful work for deaf adults and the goals and targets outlined can be viewed here.

"Who would have thought that by Americans donating to our Donate-A-Car Program would have resulted in such a wide-spread, social impact," said NAPLC President, Eileen McCloskey.

Local police departments and fire-fighting units, both public and private, have a long and rich history of reaching out to our disadvantaged, especially our children, a tradition the National
Association of Police and Lay Charities seeks to continue and augment.

Remember the fireman, his great coat burnt and charred, stumbling out of a collapsing inferno with a baby in his arms? Remember the kindly cop on his beat, tipping his cap to ladies, stopping traffic so the elderly or debilitated could cross the street?

These are the cherished heros with whom the National Association of Police and Lay Charities have sought to align and help with their charitable endeavors. Have these men and women, noted for their feats of courage and nobility of purpose, become no more than glimmering memories in our hard and cynical age? No! Not if we demand that fire-fighters and local law enforcement officers adhere to the higher standards of humanity, all goals supported by the National Association of Police and Lay Charities.

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Jack S. Williams

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