More Whole Grains for Your Gluten-Free Diet; Carol Fenster Offer Tips for National Nutrition Month

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Look beyond traditional whole wheat choices to find a wide variety of safe whole grains for the gluten-free diet, says Carol Fenster, Ph.D., a cooking expert who helps people eat nutritiously without gluten.

Getting the recommended 3 to 5 daily servings of whole grains is possible even if you're on a gluten-free diet. Look beyond traditional whole wheat choices to find a wide variety of safe grains, says Carol Fenster, Ph.D., a cooking expert who helps people eat nutritiously without gluten.

For easier cooking of whole grain buckwheat or brown rice, her new book, Gluten-Free Quick & Easy, recommends a slow-cooker for delicious overnight breakfast porridge using four cups of liquid for each cup of whole grain. Or, following package directions simmer a batch of whole grain quinoa, millet, or amaranth on the stove and refrigerate it. Throughout the week, heat individual servings for a quick, yet nutritious breakfast.

Look for the new gluten-free oats at your local health food store. Cook them just like regular oatmeal or make granola to serve with fresh fruit or stir into yogurt.

Make pancakes or waffles more nourishing by adding a quarter cup of cooked millet or brown rice to the batter. Add a quarter cup of uncooked cereal flakes such as buckwheat or quinoa to muffin or quick bread batter. Or, add a tablespoon or two of cooked buckwheat or wild rice to scrambled eggs.

Hearty, whole grain soups are great for lunch. Use whole grain buckwheat or wild rice in place of barley in vegetable soups. Cooked amaranth, teff, or millet adds wonderful fiber and protein to nutritious lentil or bean soup.

Add a handful of cooked whole grains to mixed green salads or cooked pasta. Replace bulgur with cooked quinoa or brown rice. Even popcorn counts as a whole grain.

At dinner, replace white rice with nutritious brown rice or cook whole grain quinoa, wild rice, or millet in broth and your usual flavorings. Add cooked whole grains to stuffing for turkeys, chicken, or pork chops.

Desserts can be healthier by adding whole grains. Gluten-free rolled oats make crunchy toppings for fruit crisp. Leftover cooked grains such as millet or brown rice enhance pudding. Sprinkle gluten-free granola over ice cream or add small amounts of cooked amaranth or teff to brownie batter or chocolate cake batter. A little here, a little there--every bite helps you reach your daily intake of whole grains. Visit http://wholegrainscouncil.org/whole-grains-101 for more information and to determine serving sizes.

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CAROL FENSTER, PH.D.
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