Arts Sponsorship Spending To Total $832 Million In 2008

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North American-based companies will spend an estimated $832 million to sponsor art museums, symphony orchestras, performing arts venues and other arts and cultural attractions in 2008, a 3.4 percent increase from the $805 million outlay in '07, according to IEG Sponsorship Report, the world's leading authority on sponsorship.

North American-based companies will spend an estimated $832 million to sponsor art museums, symphony orchestras, performing arts venues and other arts and cultural attractions in 2008, a 3.4 percent increase from the $805 million outlay in '07, according to IEG Sponsorship Report, the world's leading authority on sponsorship.

That growth rate is lower than in past years due mostly to the sluggish economy and sponsors putting more money into the perceived safer bet of sports sponsorships and their offering of more obvious commercial benefits.

"While growth in annual spending has taken a slight dip from previous years, more and more properties are taking the steps necessary to stay competitive and provide significant value for sponsors' investments," said William Chipps, IEG Sponsorship Report's senior editor.

For example, a growing number of performing arts venues are taking a less-is-more approach by offering prime benefits to a limited number of sponsors, as well as offering proprietary platforms that sponsors can call their own.

Case in point: Toyota Motor Corp. U.S.A., Inc.'s Lexus division leverages its sponsorship of the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County by providing complimentary valet parking for Lexus owners.

In addition, companies are increasingly tapping the arts for inventory they can share with customers and employees. Continental Airlines, Inc. is activating its partnership with the New Jersey Performing Arts Center by providing its OnePass frequent flyer members the opportunity to use miles to bid on private boxes, dinner packages, backstage passes and other NJPAC inventory. Continental runs similar promotions with Carnegie Hall and other sponsored properties.

Financial services are by far the most active sponsor of the arts, with retail banks, brokerage firms and similar types of companies using the medium to promote their brands, demonstrate their community involvement and entertain clients and prospects.

Other active categories include airlines, automotive, insurance, newspaper, accounting firms and utilities.

About IEG, LLC

IEG is the world's leading provider of independent research, consulting, training and analysis on sponsorship. Founded in 1981, IEG provides corporations and properties with the strategies and tools to harness the sales and marketing power of sports, arts, entertainment and cause marketing.

IEG offers services that include sponsorship consulting, competitive intelligence and valuation. IEG also publishes IEG Sponsorship Report, the international biweekly newsletter on sponsorship; the IEG Sponsorship Sourcebook, the definitive guide to sponsors, properties and agencies; and other industry publications and sources.

IEG also is the leader in sponsorship training. Its internationally renowned Sponsorship Conference, now in its 26th year, attracts a capacity crowd of delegates each year. Through its conferences, seminars and webinars, IEG has trained more than 45,000 sponsorship executives worldwide.

For more information about IEG and the sponsorship industry, please visit http://www.sponsorship.com or call 800/834-4850 (outside the U.S. and Canada, 312/944-1727).

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William Chipps
IEG, LLC
312-944-1727
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