Leading Researchers Describe Consequences Of Vitamin D Impoverished Society

Share Article

This month's online Vitamin D Council newsletter reports on the recent vitamin D symposium held in San Diego, where four leading researchers described a vitamin D impoverished American population, even in sunny areas, that suffers with excessive rates of cancer, bone problems, type-1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, heart disease, hypertension, influenza, falls in the elderly, mental illness, and a number of other serious and potentially avoidable disorders.

This month's online Vitamin D Council newsletter reports on the recent vitamin D symposium held in San Diego, where four leading researchers described a vitamin D impoverished American population, even in sunny areas, that suffers with excessive rates of cancer, bone problems, type-1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, heart disease, hypertension, influenza, falls in the elderly, mental illness, and a number of other serious and potentially avoidable disorders.

The conference was sponsored by Grassroots Health (http://www.grassrootshealth.org), a new organization dedicated to ending the epidemic of vitamin D deficiency. The San Diego Black Nurses Association helped organize the conference, which is appropiate as death and disability from vitamin D deficiency is much higher in the black community than among whites.

Cancer data dominated the symposium because the relationship between cancer and a lack of vitamin D is striking. Apparently 30 years of scientific evidence hasn't been enough to convince health authorities that vitamin D from sunshine or dietary supplements prevents cancer. In this month's online newsletter, Dr. John Cannell, founder of The Vitamin D Council, reports on three-decades old research published by Professor Cedric Garland, University of California at San Diego epidemiologist, evidence that has gone unheeded by modern medicine.

At the seminar, Professor Robert Heaney of Creighton University attempted to field questions as to how the National Academy of Sciences established a "safe upper limit" for vitamin D by saying toxicologists dominated that decision and solely described sunlight and its hormone-like vitamin D as potentially toxic, setting the upper safe limit in foods and supplements that is equivalent to just a few minutes of summer sun. Researchers at the seminar pointed out that many people, especially African Americans, will need to take more than 2,000 IU per day, the government's upper limit, just to obtain adequate levels.

The Vitamin D Council online newsletter and website were launched five years ago to dispel many of the myths and misinformation surrounding this sunshine vitamin. To learn more visit: Vitamin D Council Newsletters (http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/releases.shtml).

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Lucy Sardi
Visit website