Today on Titlepage.tv: Authors Reject Title of "Cultural Ambassador"

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Four acclaimed authors born outside the U.S. heatedly debate the role of one's cultural origin in one's writing, while discussing their latest books on the most recent episode of the literary internet talk show, Titlepage.tv.

proved himself as inventive as Nabokov or Salman Rushdie.

Four acclaimed authors born outside the U.S. heatedly debate the role of one's cultural origin in one's writing, while discussing their latest books on the most recent episode of the literary internet talk show, Titlepage.tv.

"As a person straddling two cultures, I can't tell you how thrilling it was to film an episode in which our guests come to discuss -- at times vehemently -- how much their cultural backgrounds impact on their writing," says Lina Matta, Executive Producer of the newly created literary web series, Titlepage.tv.

Characterizing his third novel, The Lazarus Project, as a post 9/11 book Bosnian-American author, Aleksandar Hemon rejects the notion of the author as an instructor: "I have never thought for a moment that I was the one who was supposed to represent Bosnian culture to Americans. It is not an elective office," says Hemon once described by The Los Angeles Times as a writer who "proved himself as inventive as Nabokov or Salman Rushdie."

"I think your books inevitably will turn out to be the book that one nowadays reads to learn about Lebanese culture or Bosnian culture", says Simon Winchester, the author of newly released The Man Who Loved China, addressing Hemon and Rabih Alameddine, the Lebanese born author of 'The Hakawati', a novel set against a modern-day story of war-torn Beirut.

"I don't want to be pigeonholed into an ethnic category," states Nam Le who was born in Vietnam and was raised in Australia and whose debut collection of stories, portrays characters from Australia, Vietnam, Iran, Colombia, Japan, and America simply.

"With the internet our audience is truly international. The questions our guests raise will hit a chord, and result in much debate," says Matta.

"Speaking about debate," adds Matta, "today, former guest and author of 'All the Sad Young Literary Men', Keith Gessen, will be in the discussions forum of the website for a virtual Q&A with the viewers on among other things - how writing his book might have 'ruined' his social life. We are growing as a literary community and are very happy that some authors are embracing the internet's possibilities to expand the communication with their readers."

Starting today, Simon Winchester, Nam Le, Rabih Alameddine and Aleksandar Hemon can be seen online at http://www.titlepage.tv.

For Titlepage inquires, please contact:
Tel: +1 212 655 9662
email: info @ titlepage.tv

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Odile Isralson

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