Live and Invest Overseas Names World's Three Most Affordable Retirement Cities

Share Article

Cuenca, Ecuador is the world's cheapest place to retire. You could live in this beautiful, safe colonial city on as little as $660 per month if you own your own home or on as little as $1,240 a month if you rent. Farther south, Uruguay likewise offers the would-be retiree remarkably affordable and appealing options. In both seaside Atlantida and lively Salto, Uruguay, you could live comfortably on $1,038 per month if you purchase a home, on $1,555 if you choose instead to rent one.

Live and Invest Overseas names world's three most affordable retirement cities.

Ecuador is the world's cheapest place to retire. You could live in this beautiful, safe country on as little as $660 per month if you own your own home or on as little as $1,240 a month if you rent.

World's second-cheapest place to retire overseas? Uruguay, where you could live comfortably on $1,038 per month if you purchase a home, on $1,555 if you choose instead to rent one.

In Ecuador, Cuenca is the foreign retiree's best option, offering a surprisingly high standard of living for the cost.

At just over 400,000 people, Cuenca is the perfect size. It's small enough so that you always see someone you know when walking around town and you know how to get around, how to get things done. What's more, people know and remember you, which makes you feel at home and part of the community.

And the colonial architecture, Andean markets, and heritage of the city make you feel that you're really experiencing another country and a rich culture.

Our budget is for two people, and you can read it in full detail here.
http://www.liveandinvestoverseas.com/countrybudgets/ecuadorbudget.html

Furthermore, remember that Ecuador uses the U.S. dollar. So, while the dollar's decline is causing expat prices to rise in neighboring countries, Ecuador remains stable for dollar-holders.

Uruguay is home to the world's other most affordable retirement cities. If you're retiring to Uruguay on a budget, the ideal location depends on whether you're looking for a seaside or a city lifestyle.

Best choice for coastal living is Atlantida.

A small town with a permanent population of just over 3,500, Atlantida swells to more than 19,000 when the summertime visitors arrive. Its shady, tree-lined streets and large, older homes have the feel of a year-round home town, rather than a vacation resort. The calm, crescent-shaped cove is ringed with a sandy beach, and its seaside park is a frequent destination for both residents and visitors from Montevideo.

If city living is more your style, Salto is the place. Located about 300 miles up-river from Montevideo, Salto is like a mini version of the country's capital city. Just about every major store that has a branch in Montevideo has one in Salto, as well. What Salto doesn't have is Montevideo's crime, property prices, or tax rates. You'll enjoy a markedly lower cost of living.

As Uruguay's second-largest city, with just over 100,000 people, Salto is one of the few cities in the country that you never have to leave if you don't want to. Its commercial district, entertainment scene, restaurants, and municipal services should provide everything you'd need and want without having to own a car.

For a complete and fully itemized budget of monthly expenses for a couple living in both these cities, read here. http://www.liveandinvestoverseas.com/countrybudgets/uruguaybudget.html

Live and Invest Overseas (http://www.liveandinvestoverseas.com) is dedicated to uncovering the world's best opportunities for living, retiring, investing, and owning real estate. Publisher Kathleen Peddicord, with more than 22 years experience covering this beat, and her global network of in-country connections are on the move continuously in search of opportunity. Their from-the-scene dispatches, tips, recommendations, discoveries, and insights are delivered every Tuesday to readers of their free e-letter service, the "Overseas Opportunity Letter."

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Harry Kalashian
Visit website