Vote and Learn in the First-Ever Nonprofit Tagline Award Competition

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Place your vote today for the 2008 Getting Attention Nonprofit Tagline Awards.

Nonprofit professionals from everywhere can learn how to strengthen their own organization's tagline and help select some of the best in class by voting in the 2008 Getting Attention Nonprofit Tagline Awards competition.

Place your vote (http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=OLopLvSLwRplBFtWnFz6lQ_3d_3d) today. Polling closes Friday, June 20th.

"Voters to date have welcomed the opportunity to learn," says Nancy Schwartz, blogger at Getting Attention (http://www.gettingattention.org) and president of Nancy Schwartz & Company (http://www.nancyschwartz.com), who conducted the survey and designed the award program.

Here are comments from a few voters:
==> "I loved being able to see all these approaches, the contrast is stark between what works (communicates, evokes my interest) for me, and what doesn't."
==> "Great examples of the struggle to create taglines with meaning."
==> "By voting, I learned how to make our tagline better."
==> "Fascinating survey... while completing it there were so many factors that were influencing my choices. Upbeat? Positive? Short & pithy? Too many words? Starting with a negative?"
==> "Mostly I reacted with my gut. Did it clearly tell me the story? Did it make me want to know more? Did it move me to action?"

Schwartz says the 56 tagline finalists have been carefully culled from more than 1,000 taglines submitted to the Getting Attention Tagline Survey. The organizations behind these taglines have succeeded in putting eight words or less to work to build their brands.

"Many nonprofits aren't using taglines to their full potential. But, a strong tagline is vital. It's the anchor for an organization's brand and, next to its name, the marketing message most frequently heard," says Schwartz. "But many nonprofit communicators simply haven't had the time to shape their organization's tagline or, more frequently, don't know what it takes to make it more powerful."

By participating in the voting, which takes about seven minutes, nonprofit professionals will have a chance to reflect on what works and what doesn't work for them, and consider how their own organization's tagline holds up. "It's both a learning experience and a chance to participate in a fun project that can help nonprofits everywhere," says Schwartz.

The Getting Attention Nonprofit Tagline Survey, implemented December 2007 through January 2008, investigated styles, usage trends, what's working and what's not in nonprofit taglines based on data provided by 1,900 nonprofit communicators across ten vertical sectors and countless locations (mostly within the United States). Participating organizations ranged from the Pulmonary Hypertension Association to the Bendigo (Australia) Figure Skating Club and the Oregon Center for Public Policy.

Survey results and award winners will be published in a free report due out in July 2008. This new report will dig into nonprofit taglines, providing models, dos and don'ts, trends in tagline use and longevity, and a directory of over 1,000 nonprofit taglines (the first ever).

Place your vote (http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=OLopLvSLwRplBFtWnFz6lQ_3d_3d) today for the best in nonprofit taglines and sign up to receive the free report.

==> About Getting Attention/Nancy Schwartz
The Getting Attention blog and e-newsletter (http://www.gettingattention.org) are no-charge, high-value sources of ideas, tactics, and tips for nonprofit communicators focused on helping their organizations succeed through effective marketing.

Nancy Schwartz provides marketing services to nonprofit organizations and grantmakers via Nancy Schwartz & Company, and is the editor and publisher of Getting Attention.

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