Scientist Discusses Research Investigating Additional Pathogens Causing Lyme Disease Symptoms on 'Interviews with Experts' Series

Lyme disease researcher Eva Sapi, PhD, discusses current projects at the University of New Haven on the audio series, 'Interviews with Experts'. Studies analyze additional pathogens besides Borrelia suspected of contributing to Lyme disease symptoms. Research also focuses on finding reasons why antibiotics do not always kill Lyme bacteria. Sapi expresses concern over the rapid increase in number of ticks infected with Lyme bacteria. The interview is part of an ongoing series offering Lyme specialists a program for discussing Lyme disease symptoms, diagnosis and treatment. http://www.lyme-disease-research-database.com/

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Asheville, NC (PRWEB) June 15, 2008

Lyme disease researcher Professor Eva Sapi discusses research projects currently underway at the University of New Haven, on 'Interviews with Experts' series. Studies look into additional pathogens aside from Borrelia suspected of contributing to Lyme disease symptoms. Furthermore, UNH research investigates reasons antibiotics do not always successfully kill Lyme bacteria. Sapi also talks about the rapid increase in number of ticks infected with Lyme bacteria in Fairfield County, NY, and the difficulty of publishing new scientific findings amid controversy over chronic Lyme disease. The interview is part of a unique series providing experts a place to discuss Lyme disease symptoms, diagnosis and research, and helping educate health care providers and Lyme patients. Learn more on the LDRD blog-
http://www.lyme-disease-research-database.com/lyme_disease_blog.html
Professor Sapi is the graduate program coordinator at the department of biology and environmental science at the University of New Haven, Connecticut. In addition to conducting scientific research, she organizes an annual Lyme disease symposium at UNH. Speakers for the 2008 symposium included Lyme researcher Dr. Alan MacDonald, and Lyme physicians and specialists Dr. Lee Cowden and Dr. Richard Horowitz. Cowden and Horowitz discussed the latest findings in alternative methods to Lyme disease treatment.

"I think that's very important to understand that we need a multilevel approach to deal with Lyme disease," says Sapi.

Sapi suspects that mild New England winters over the past two years have aided the increased tick population. Ticks collected by the UNH Lyme disease research group in fall 2007 showed that sixty percent of the ticks collected in Fairfield county, Connecticut, were infected with the Lyme bacteria, Borrelia, up from previous years when the percentage of infected ticks was twenty to thirty.

"I'm afraid it's going to be a very bad year. And epidemically, it will be even worse," she says.

Sapi has gained support from physicians such as Dr. Joseph Burrascano and agencies such as the Turn the Corner Foundation of NY, which has granted funds for two Lyme research projects underway at UNH. In spite of criticism she suggests is unreasonable that delays her scientific publications, she maintains a single, powerfully focused goal in Lyme research.

"I have a very simple goal. I want to kill this bug," she says. "And not next year, not in ten years, but soon. Every experiment is about how to kill it and how to help Lyme patients."

The 'Interviews with Experts' series, available at the Lyme Disease Research Database, provides a reliable resource for people affected by Lyme disease. Other interviews include Lyme researcher Dr. Alan MacDonald, who discusses the significance of biofilms in Lyme disease, and Dr. Lee Cowden, who talks about the latest findings in alternative methods to the treatment of Lyme disease.

For additional information on the Lyme Disease Research Database, visit http://www.lyme-disease-research-database.com/about_lyme_disease_database.html. Access to the cutting edge news from experts on Lyme disease is available immediately.

About LDRD:
Private health and wellness advocates have been gathering information on conventional and integrative approaches to heal from Lyme disease since 2005.

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