TV Show Draws Massive Audience of Martial Artists

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Learn why tens of thousands of martial artists -- of all ages from across the United States -- were doing something very unusual on Saturday afternoon -- June 14th, 2008. They were all watching the hit MTV show, MADE, in order to see an accurate portrayal of martial arts -- where self-esteem, focus and self-discipline are emphasized instead of fighting and violence.

It is very satisfying to see the true nature of martial arts being shown on TV.

Tens of thousands of martial artists -- of all ages from across the United States -- were doing something unusual on Saturday afternoon. They were watching television. Sitting in front of a TV set isn't a normal weekend activity for disciplined, active and accomplished martial artists, but the June 14th airwaves included a must-watch show.

Surveys repeatedly demonstrate that the vast majority of the American public has an inaccurate understanding of martial arts. Most people think it is just about kicking and punching -- which is totally false. The pervasiveness of "ultimate fighting" (often referred to as "mixed martial arts") on TV has aggravated this false perception.

Traditional martial arts training isn't about fighting and violence. Instead, it emphasizes the development of self-esteem, self-discipline, focus and concentration, physical fitness and competency in self defense. In other words, martial arts is about becoming a better human being.

The reason so many martial artists were watching TV on June 14th was that they were eager to see martial arts portrayed in the correct way on MADE, the extremely popular MTV show where a teenager is transformed ("made") into a different person. In the 100th episode of MADE that premiered on Saturday, a sedentary Wisconsin teenager takes on the challenge of being "made" into a disciplined martial artist.

Master Chan Lee, the martial arts teacher in this episode, has been on a mission to correct the perception of traditional martial arts for years --- via how he runs his five martial arts schools (http://www.JKLeeBlackBelt.com) in the Milwaukee area and his leadership of two national martial arts associations. This TV show was his best opportunity yet to fulfill this mission so, a few weeks ago, he launched a national campaign to notify his fellow martial artists of the time and date of the premier airing. His hope was that MTV would see the response and schedule future episodes where a teen is transformed by martial arts.

By all accounts his efforts were a success and tens of thousands of martial artists tuned into MTV on Saturday afternoon to watch martial arts being accurately portrayed. Chan Lee said "It is very satisfying to see the true nature of martial arts being shown on TV."

To learn more about the transformational benefits of martial arts, please visit the Better Kids Institute (http://www.BetterKidsInstitute.com). For more information on Master Chan Lee and his five martial arts schools in Milwaukee, WI, please go to http://www.JKLeeBlackBelt.com.

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Chan Lee

Allen Oelschlaeger
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