New 'Mortgage Liberator Guidebook' Gives Homeowners Plan for Protecting Against Foreclosure and the Rising Cost of Debt

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Save your home and survive changing economic conditions by taking a page from the corporate play book: learn to protect against financial disaster. By mastering one interest-rate market, such as U.S. Treasury bond options, homeowners may develop a new income stream to offset inflation and the declining value of the U.S. Dollar.

Even homeowners with fixed-rate mortgages must realize that changes in the economy will, in some way, affect their monthly costs. Master one market to create a separate income source for a specific purpose - housing costs.

Homeowners facing foreclosure or the financial pain inflicted by adjustable-rate mortgages need to fight back. A Mortgage Liberator Guidebook: How to pay your bills as interest rates change can teach them how.

Published by After The Noise, the newly released guidebook was researched and developed by Douglas Glenn Clark before the subprime loan crisis became the cause of a record number of foreclosures. The purpose was to develop a simple method that allowed homeowners to actually benefit from interest rate changes. By creating a new income stream, homeowners can pay down debt - without taking a second job.

"A few years ago, financial experts like Warren Buffett and Jim Sinclair predicted that something bad was coming as a result of over-the-counter derivative investments. Then a family member got involved in a complicated adjustable-rate mortgage. I feared rising interest rates would cause real harm," he said, adding, his research took several years to complete.

Clark says homeowners must take a page from the corporate play book and learn to hedge against changing economic conditions. For example, corporations that make breakfast food cannot withstand inflated prices in corn, wheat and sugar. Therefore, in all economic climates, they take action to protect their bottom line by hedging those costs.

Also, corporations hedge in markets that directly affect their business. Homeowners can do the same by mastering one interest-rate market, such as the U.S. Treasury bonds. This is a good time to do so because the credit crunch is far from over. Money supply increases ignite inflation which eventually cause higher interest rates - all of which impact Treasury bonds.

When individuals and couples prepare to buy a new home, they begin to watch interest rates. They know they'll save enormous amounts of money if they can lock in a low rate on a 20- or 30-year loan. But once they've purchased their home, often they stop watching interest rates. This is a big mistake, says Clark.

"Even homeowners with fixed-rate mortgages must realize that changes in the economy will, in some way, affect their monthly costs. Master one market to create a separate income source for a specific purpose - housing costs."

Nearly every day the average homeowner listens to a news broadcast that mentions interest rates. Higher rates slow borrowing, whereas lower rates generally ease the availability of loans. Common people with a little knowledge can learn how to make money by exploiting these changes. But only if they learn some basics about U.S. Treasury bond options. To make that process easy, Clark posts free market analysis and updates at http://www.afterthenoise.com .

The next step is to begin a study program. Using real option data (not theories) with plenty of visual learning tools, A Mortgage Liberator Guidebook: How to pay your bills as interest rates change teaches the basics of U.S. Treasury bond options and fully reveals how to take part in this global market.

The methods taught in A Mortgage Liberator Guidebook may not be appropriate for everyone. There is risk of loss when trading any financial market.

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Douglas Glenn Clark
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