SAM Learning Brings Successful U.K. Program to U.S. High Schools

Share Article

According to data reported in Diplomas Count 2008 from Education Week, 1.23 million students will fail to graduate in 2008. A U.K. company, SAM Learning, is bringing its successful web-based learning program to the U.S. to help students prepare for High School Exit Exams (HSEE) and, hopefully, stem the tide.

screen shot 2

This indicates that SAM Learning is appealing to students and they are self motivated to use it at home, in the library or wherever else they do their studying.

According to data reported in Diplomas Count 2008 from Education Week, 1.23 million students will fail to graduate in 2008. SAM Learning (http://www.samlearning.com) -- a U.K. company that publishes a web-based learning program -- is hoping to stem the tide by bringing its successful High School Exit Exam (HSEE) prep program to U.S. schools. The program will be introduced this week at the National Educational Computing Conference in San Antonio.

For eight years, SAM Learning has been effectively used in U.K. schools and in those of four other countries. One million students currently use SAM Learning for test prep and remediation including U.S. schools in California, Wyoming, Florida and Washington where pilot programs are underway.

"Our program has been so successful in preparing secondary students for graduation in other countries that it was a logical choice to bring SAM Learning to the United States," said David Jaffa, founder and president of SAM Learning. "We are seeing encouraging results with our pilot schools and felt it was the right time to introduce SAM Learning at NECC where thousands of teachers and administrators will be looking for solutions."

The data reported by Education Week underscores the critical need for programs specifically tailored to high school students nearing graduation. SAM Learning is particularly successful in addressing this problem. Four years of independent research on SAM Learning found that students who used the program for over 10 hours scored 20% higher on their GCSE (equivalent to the U.S. version of High School Exit Exams) than those who had not used SAM Learning. The research also found that at-risk students -- including those who would be categorized as Title 1 or ELL (English Language Learners) in the U.S. -- showed the greatest gains when using SAM Learning.

"Not only is the research showing a substantial positive effect on outcomes, but our usage data show that students spend nearly 50 percent of their time on SAM Learning outside of school hours," said Jaffa. "This indicates that SAM Learning is appealing to students and they are self motivated to use it at home, in the library or wherever else they do their studying."

SAM Learning will be featured in the NECC exhibit hall in booth 745. Schools and districts interested in pilot testing the program for the 2008-09 school year are encouraged to inquire at the booth or by sending an email to info@samlearning.com.

About SAM Learning
SAM Learning (http://www.samlearning.com) is based in London, England. Over 50 percent of the U.K. secondary schools use SAM Learning for test prep and remediation in mathematics, science, social studies and language arts. In addition to success with secondary students, SAM Learning is used in primary/elementary grades with positive results and improved assessment performance. SAM Learning is student-driven and uses scaffolded pedagogy to increase student competency in core subjects. For more information email info @ samlearning.com.

# # #

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Jennifer Harrison
Visit website