Armistead Technologies Celebrates 19 Years Of Moving Forward In Reverse

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John Armistead, founder and owner of reverse engineering firm Armistead Technologies, reflects on nearly two decades of reverse engineering printed circuit boards (PCBs) as his firm celebrates 19 years in business.

The year was 1989. George H.W. Bush was president. The Berlin Wall fell. If you want to feel old, think about this: 1989 was the year Harry Potter star Daniel Radcliffe was born. Yes, born. Also born in 1989: Armistead Technologies, a reverse engineering firm founded by John Armistead.

Then, as now, Armistead Technologies specialized in reverse engineering printed circuit boards (PCBs), the "brains" that control machines. Reverse engineered circuit board designs can integrate additional features and updated components, to increase functionality and reduce costs. The result is a plug-in replacement PCB that can extend the life -- and lifecycle -- of a product.

Over the past 19 years, Armistead has seen many changes. "Technology has actually made things harder," he says. "For instance, surface-mounted components have gotten super-tiny, and density has gone up, which makes the precise placement of components and circuits more critical than ever."

"Some chips now have software on-board, and from a reverse engineering standpoint it's very difficult to extract that software from the chip," Armistead continues. "And, more circuit boards use BGAs, which slow down the reverse engineering process." BGAs are ball grid arrays, a type of surface-mount integrated circuit. They are popular with circuit board designers and manufacturers because they are cheaper and can carry more pins, or electrical contact points, than the older-style pin grid array (PGA) IC.

Despite new challenges, or maybe because of them, Armistead Technologies continues to grow. "With today's complex circuit boards, it's a lot more cost-effective for an engineering manager to outsource the job of reverse engineering a PCB to us rather than take one of his engineers off projects with a bigger potential upside, like new product development," Armistead says. "And, because we're reverse engineering specialists, we can get the job done a lot quicker, too."

Armistead looks forward to many more years of serving the electronics industry with innovative, accurate reverse engineering services. "Whenever anyone needs a U.S.-based firm to handle a PCB reverse engineering project," Armistead says, "we'll be here,"

About Armistead Technologies, LLC.
Armistead Technologies is an engineering firm based near Baltimore, Maryland. It was founded in 1989 by John Armistead, a graduate electrical engineer from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Armistead Technologies specializes in reverse engineering printed circuit boards, and re-engineering older PCB designs to be compliant with updated standards and compatibilities.

For more information about getting re-engineered replacement PCBs, visit http://www.armisteadtechnologies.com/ or call John Armistead at (410) 627-2408.

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