The 2008 Atlantic Hurricane Forecast - Here's the Latest; Beet Street's June Science Café at New Location

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June Science Café focuses on the latest predictions of hurricane activity, on Wednesday, June 11 beginning at 6pm. Climatologist Philip J. Klotzbach, Ph.D. will lead the discussion. In issuing their revised seasonal outlook for 2008, the Colorado State University Atmospheric Research team reignited a controversy over whether long-range forecasts have any validity. Some forecasters say predictions so far in advance contain too much margin for error, confuse the public and may lull people into not making adequate hurricane preparations. Come to hear how predictions are created.

Beet Street presents its June Science Café focusing on the latest predictions of hurricane activity, on Wednesday, June 11 beginning at 6pm. Philip J. Klotzbach will lead the discussion on, The 2008 Atlantic Hurricane Forecast - Here's the Latest! at a new location this month: Starry Night Espresso Café, 112 South College in Fort Collins.

Klotzbach is a Research Scientist in the Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University. He recently received his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science from CSU. Klotzbach has been employed in the Department of Atmospheric Science for the past seven years where he has been co-author on the Atlantic basin hurricane forecasts with Dr. William Gray. He became first author on the seasonal hurricane forecasts in 2006. On December 7, Klotzbach and Gray issued their Extended Range Forecast of Atlantic Seasonal Hurricane Activity and US Landfall Strike Probability for 2008. At that time, they foresaw a somewhat above-average tropical cyclone season for 2008 (13 named storms), with above-average probability of a major hurricane landfall in the United States. An update will be issued on June 3, so we will be the first to hear the latest predictions and find out how they are made, what their rate of accuracy has been, and whether we should take a trip to Florida or the Gulf Coast this summer!

The monthly Cafés have been quite popular, and it is recommended to arrive by 5:30pm to order a snack and get a good seat. Details on speakers, topics and location of future Science Cafés will be posted on the web, http://www.beetstreet.org/en/Science-Cafe.html.
Held on the second Wednesday of each month, Science Café Fort Collins hosts expert scientists from a diverse range of disciplines, who make a short presentation followed by questions,
answers and discussion among those in attendance. Science Cafés are free and open to the public. Seating is limited.

The Science Café concept originated in English pubs in Leeds, U.K. in 1988. Since then, over 160 cafes, including the newest one in Fort Collins, have emerged around the world, stimulating dialog and aha!-moments as people connect science to their everyday world. Other Science Cafes in Colorado are held regularly in Denver, Boulder, and Colorado Springs.

ABOUT BEET STREET
Beet Street (http://www.beetstreet.org) is an economic development initiative created by the Fort Collins Downtown Development Authority in 2007 to distinguish Old Town Fort Collins as a cultural destination that fosters, celebrates, and inspires human creativity through diverse cultural experiences and programming. Beet Street will create a collaborative learning community in Fort Collins, Colorado, where everyone of every age is welcome to share in discussion, reflection, and creative expression.

Bio for Philip J. Klotzbach
Philip J. Klotzbach is a Research Scientist in the Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University. He recently received his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science from CSU. Klotzbach has been employed in the Department of Atmospheric Science for the past seven years where he has been co-author on the Atlantic basin hurricane forecasts with Dr. William Gray. He became first author on the seasonal hurricane forecasts in 2006.

Klotzbach graduated with a 4.0 GPA from Bridgewater State College with a BS degree in Geography in 1999. He then attended Colorado State University where he received his Masters degree in Atmospheric Science in 2002. After receiving his Masters degree in 2002, Klotzbach thru-hiked the Appalachian Trail from Georgia to Maine (2100+ miles). He has also climbed all 55 14,000 foot peaks in Colorado.

He developed the Landfalling Hurricane Probability Webpage (available online at http://www.e-transit.org/hurricane) in partnership with the GeoGraphics Laboratory at Bridgewater State College. This webpage provides hurricane landfall probabilities for 11 regions, 55 sub-regions and 205 coastal counties from Brownsville, Texas to Eastport, Maine. Since the webpage went online on June 1, 2004, it has received over 500,000 hits. Besides tropical cyclones, Klotzbach's other research interests include climate change and nor'easters. He has had several research papers published in scholarly journals including papers published in the American Meteorological Society's journals Weather and Forecasting and the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

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