Filmmaker Rosalind Schneider Receives 2008 Women's Film Preservation Award Grant for 1973 film "Parallax"

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New York Women in Film & Television's Women's Film Preservation Fund (WFPF) announced grants to be awarded in 2008 to restore and preserve eight films by women, including "Parallax" (1973) by Rosalind Schneider This three-screen film that explores the sensuous flow of the female and male body as a reoccurring metaphor for change. This dance film is choreographed by Edith Stephen.

pictorially similar to an enormous fresco, Parallax moves its characters through a dance without time and perhaps without end.

New York Women in Film & Television Preservation Fund (WFPF) announced grants to eight noted women filmmakers this month, including the work of Artist Rosalind Schneider. 'Parallax' (1973) is a three-screen film that explores the sensuous flow of the female and male body as a reoccurring metaphor for change. The dance film was choreographed by Edith Stephen. Singled out by MM Serra of The Filmmakers Coop, the film is "pictorially similar to an enormous fresco, Parallax moves its characters through a dance without time and perhaps without end."

"Both 'Parallax' and and 'Tidal Abstraction' have been accepted into the Museum of Modern Art archive," upon completion of the restoration, according to Anne Morra of the MOMA Film Department. "Rosalind has been in the vanguard of 'Art of the Moving Image' or 'Film as Art' since the early 70's." Her expansive and prolific body of work spans over 40 years as an artist exploring the nature of energy and our natural environment. In the process, she has captured the energy and power of water, icebergs, trees and landscapes and translated it into her own artistic language. Her singular vision has taken her on a creative journey that has pushed the boundaries of visual media from painting to sculpture to film, video and digital media. Her quest has led to the mastery and fusion of these various media to create an original and unique visual language for the forces of nature.

"Rosalind was the first artist to show 'Film as Art' at the Hirshhorn Museum in 1974," according to her artist representatives, Joan Daidone and Lisa Cooper. Her films were also part of "The Color of Ritual, The Color of Thought, Women Avant-Garde Filmmakers in America 1930-2000" curated by Chrissie Iles at the Whitney Museum. Most recently, her video installation of "Wave Transformations" was projected on a huge inflatable globe during Art Basel Miami 2006 at the Miami Beach Cinematheque, and her film "Idyllic Landscape" was projected at the Lyndhurst Historic Site "The Green Life" event. Her Digital Fusion Paintings based on her film "Tidal Reflections" were recently shown at a concert performance at the Chelsea Art Museum in New York.

In addition to Rosalind Schneider, WFPF also awarded grants to Liane Brandon for "Anything You Want To Be" (1971) and "Betty Tells Her Story" (1972); "Desire Pie" (1976) by Lisa Crafts; "Las Madres: The Mothers Of Plaza De Mayo" (1985) by Lourdes Portillo, "South East Coal Company" (1979); "The Daughter Of Niagara" (1910) by Joseph A. Golden and "Will" (1981) by Jessie Maple.

NYWF is the first and only fund dedicated to identifying, preserving and restoring films in which women have had significant creative roles. Founded in 1995 in association with the Museum of Modern Art, the WFPF's goal is to ensure that the contributions of women to film history are not forgotten. To date the WFPF has preserved over 75 films including: Barbara Koppel's "Harlan County USA" (1976), Cinda Firestone's "Attica" (1974) as well works by pioneering film directors Lois Weber and Alice Guy Blache.

Rosalind Schneider's films, video installations and paintings are represented in New York City by Elisa Tucci Contemporary Arts.

For further information or an interview with the artist, please contact Joan Daidone or Lisa Cooper at joan @ elisatucciart.com or lisa @ elisatucciart.com, or call 212-982-0427.

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