When 'Official' Explanations Just Don't Click

Share Article

New Book Explores Conspiracy Theories for Truth--and Consequences

Too often, conspiracy thinking has been dismissed as 'kooky.' While it's easy to dismiss some conspiracy theories, it's often harder to swallow the official version of events.

Was a UFO really discovered in Roswell, New Mexico? What is the government really protecting so vigorously at Area 51? Are the paparazzi really to blame for the tragic death of Princess Diana? What really brought down TWA Flight 800---mechanical failure, terrorism, or friendly fire? Did the U.S. government really create AIDS in a laboratory to use for nefarious purposes?

In their new book, Web of Conspiracy: A Guide to Conspiracy Theory Sites on the Internet, published by Information Today, Inc. (ITI), award-winning journalists James F. Broderick and Darren W. Miller (Consider the Source: A Critical Guide to 100 Prominent News and Information Sites on the Web) offer an objective yet provocative look at various conspiracy theories and guide readers to the best sites for digging deeper.

Who really wrote the great works of "Shakespeare"? Does the Order of Skull & Bones really run the world? Was Jesus really married with children? Did American astronauts really land on the Moon and take that giant leap for mankind?

From 9/11 to Roswell, from Princess Di to the Grassy Knoll and beyond, the authors explore more than 20 of the world's most intriguing conspiracy theories. They examine the facts surrounding each theory, present prevailing and lesser-known arguments, and point to must-see Web sites that advocate, speculate, or debunk.

Was Marilyn Monroe really murdered? Is the Protocols of the Elders of Zion really an authentic document? Did FDR really have prior knowledge of the coming attacks on Pearl Harbor? Does the Trilateral Commission really shape the events of the world? Was the Hindenburg disaster really an act of sabotage?

Web of Conspiracy is the ultimate guide for Internet-connected conspiracy theorists, buffs, and researchers. Both informative and entertaining, this is a detailed, clear-eyed (and eye-opening) exploration for readers who think they've heard it all.

Did the U.S. Navy's "Philadelphia Experiment" really achieve invisibility and teleportation? Is Freemasonry really a synonym for a sinister cabal of the powerful elite? Who really killed JFK? Was 9/11 really an inside job?

"Love them or loathe them, conspiracy theories have become the gossip of the global village. For both the believer and the skeptic it can be very daunting to know how to make sense of the overwhelming amount of information, competing theories, and rebuttals that proliferate on the Internet," said Dr. Peter Knight, editor of Conspiracy Theories in American History: An Encyclopedia. "In this book Jim Broderick and Darren Miller have done a remarkable job in providing a clear-sighted and even-handed guide to the online world of conspiracy thinking, that will prove useful for both the casual surfer and the seasoned investigator alike."

Did Jim Morrison really fake his own death? What really happened to Jimmy Hoffa? Who really conspired to assassinate Lincoln? Was Charles Lindbergh really involved in the "kidnapping" of his own child?

"For years, decades, even centuries, the truth has been hidden," claim Broderick and Miller. "Too often, conspiracy thinking has been dismissed as 'kooky.' While it's easy to dismiss some conspiracy theories, it's often harder to swallow the official version of events."

As a reader bonus, the authors' Web site, http://www.TheReportersWell.com, provides links to the best and most useful conspiracy theory sites, reviews of new sites, and a list of books for further reading. To discover more about Web of Conspiracy, visit the MySpace page at http://www.myspace.com/webofconspiracy or at http://www.thereporterswell.com.

James F. Broderick teaches journalism at New Jersey City University in Jersey City, NJ. He is the author of two previous books. Darren W. Miller has worked as a reporter and editor for newspapers in New Jersey and North Carolina and is the recipient of several journalism awards. Broderick and Miller are the coauthors of Consider the Source: A Critical Guide to 100 Prominent News and Information Sites on the Web (Information Today, Inc., 2007).

Web of Conspiracy: A Guide to Conspiracy Theory Sites on the Internet (280 pp/softbound/ $19.95/ISBN 978-0-910965-81-1) is a CyberAge Book from Information Today, Inc. It is available in bookstores through Independent Publishers Group (IPG) or by calling 800-300-9868 (outside U.S. call (609) 654-6266); faxing (609) 654-4309; emailing [email protected]; or on the Web at http://www.infotoday.com.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

DAVID WHITE

James F. Broderick and Darren W. Miller
Visit website