New Study Demonstrates High Level of Safe Surgeries Performed in Accredited Facilities

Share Article

The American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities has demonstrated a low incidence of surgical complication in procedures performed in their accredited facilities. Our standards demand surgeons to be board certified in the specialty practiced within accredited surgery facilities and that they have credentials in a hospital to perform each procedure that is performed in these facilities.

The American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) has developed a new study which analyzes data submitted by accredited ambulatory surgery facilities from January 2001 through June 2006. The article derived from the study has been published in the July issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® and demonstrates that surgery in accredited ambulatory facilities can be as safe as inpatient surgery. The key fact extrapolated is that only one death occurred, out of 1,141,418 outpatient procedures performed,
as a result of an intraoperative adverse event.

AAAASF has reported statistics on morbidity and mortality for facilities that it accredits based on an analysis of unanticipated sequelae and surgical mortality. Data acquired through the first ever Internet Based Quality Assurance and Peer Review reporting system (IBQAP) were first reviewed and published in 2004. "The Internet has provided us with a wonderful tool to improve patient safety and document surgical practice," says Geoffrey R. Keyes, M.D., Quality Improvement/Peer Review Committee Chair and AAAASF board member. He has been integral in the establishment of the IBQAP system and the new study.

This article based on the study reports the accumulated data in the IBQAP through June of 2006, analyzing death associated with procedures performed in facilities accredited by the AAAASF. With the exception of some statistics on the Medicare aged population, there are few data reported in the literature related to deaths in outpatient surgery.

The study also shows that over fifty percent of deaths that occurred (there were 23 deaths in 1,141,418 outpatient procedures performed during the five and one-half years of the study) were due to pulmonary embolism. "Any death is one too many, but until we elucidate the etiology of pulmonary embolism, we are faced with this grave potential sequelae of surgery regardless of whether the procedure is performed in a hospital or an outpatient surgery facility," says Dr. Keyes.

"The American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities has demonstrated a low incidence of surgical complication in procedures performed in their accredited facilities. Our standards demand surgeons to be board certified in the specialty practiced within accredited surgery facilities and that they have credentials in a hospital to perform each procedure that is performed in these facilities," he concludes.

For a PDF version of the complete article, contact Jaime Trevino.
http://www.plasreconsurg.com
http://www.aaaasf.org

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

JAIME TREVINO
AAAASF
847-775-1970
Email >
Visit website