The Hidden Electorate: According to Generational Expert, "Silent Generation" Women Could Determine Outcome of the 2008 Presidential Election

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Although they fly "under the radar screen" of pollsters and pundits, the women of the Silent Generation, ages 66 to 83, may well determine who becomes the next President of the United States, according to generational expert Ann A. Fishman.

They had super-heroes for role models, and deeply competent public figures like President Franklin Roosevelt and General Dwight Eisenhower. Silents want to know that they are voting for the most qualified candidate

Although they fly "under the radar screen" of pollsters and pundits, the women of the Silent Generation, ages 66 to 83, may well determine who becomes the next President of the United States, according to generational expert Ann A. Fishman.

The Silent Generation started the Women's Movement. They changed the way Americans view the role of women. And, because they see voting as a citizen's privilege, "neither rain nor heat nor gloom of night" will stop them from coming out to the polls in November in great number, says

Ann Fishman, a generational studies expert and commentator on generational trends impacting politics, "Polls may be saying that women in their 40s and 50s will be the new 'swing vote' in the 2008 Presidential election, but the Silent Generation women could be the stealth vote that puts the title of President in front of Senator McCain instead of Senator Obama," says Fishman.

Here is why.

McCain's Potential Appeal to "Silent" Women

Born between 1925 and 1942, Silents have the following important characteristics, says Fishman:

#1 - Silent women see themselves as vital, active people in the prime of life. "They think of themselves as 10 to15 years younger than their chronological age," says Fishman, "So, a President's age is not an issue to the Silent Generation.

According to http://www.agingstats.gov, older generations are enjoying better health than any previous older generation in American history.

For example, Sir Paul McCartney is 6 years younger than Senator John McCain, and he is filling sports arenas and keeping pace with celebrities who are forty years younger.

So, when it comes to age and the President, the Silent Generation wonders, "What's the big deal?"

#2 - One of the core values of the Silent Generation is respect for experience and expertise.
"They had super-heroes for role models, and deeply competent public figures like President Franklin Roosevelt and General Dwight Eisenhower. Silents want to know that they are voting for the most qualified candidate," says Fishman.

If John McCain succeeds in conveying these characteristics - and portraying his opponent as inexperienced or lacking in depth -, he stands a good chance of winning their vote.

#3 - This generation of fighters for women's equality expects a level playing field.
During the Democratic primary, many women found comments directed at Senator Hillary Clinton problematic, and unfair.

"Gratuitous comments about Senator Clinton's hair styles, wrinkles, cleavage and pant suits diverted from the seriousness of her political message," notes Fishman.
She was more often than not called Hillary. Rarely was Senator McCain or Senator Obama familiarly called John or Barak.

Fishman concludes, "The Silent Generation of women, the hidden electorate that could determine who will be the next President of the U.S., may turn to McCain not only for their generational values but also because they feel that neither candidate Obama, the Democratic Party nor the media, gave the first serious female Presidential candidate a fair shake."

We will not know the outcome until a fateful night in November. But if the attitudes and values of Silent Women, a large voting block, are any indication, McCain could turn out to be the candidate of choice.

About Ann Fishman and Generational Targeted-Marketing

More information on Ann Fishman's generational expertise can be found at http://www.annfishman.com. Fishman's company, Generational-Targeted Marketing Corp. (GTM), specializes in marketing information that provides insight into consumer preferences, buying habits and trends affecting the American consumer. As GTM's president, Fishman serves as a consultant to numerous corporations, government agencies and non-profit organizations, sharing information about generational issues. She's also a member of the Adjunct Faculty at New York University. For further information on GTM, call 1-504-813-7890.

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