Dryout Inc. Helps Keep the Aviation Industry Afloat

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Dryout used industrial strength equipment and Infrared tools along with the latest drying technology to quickly uncover the water. With nearly 700 employees waiting to return to work, Dryout tackled another concern: the potential for mold growth.

But some items will need to be replaced.

Tropical storm Fay soaked the state of Florida not just once, but a record setting four times this August. Not only did Dryout come to the rescue helping homeowners mop up, Dryout also dried out a leading supplier of aircraft fuel systems.

"As with all flooding, a prompt response was of utmost concern," Mark Decherd, CEO of Dryout Inc. said. "Whenever a building is swamped to this extent, water damage mitigation becomes a top priority. The longer the water sits, the more damage occurs."

Dryout Inc. used industrial strength equipment and tools along with the latest drying technology to quickly extract the water. With nearly 700 employees waiting to return to work, Dryout tackled another concern: the potential for mold growth.

"We didn't want this air and fuel facility to become the next building to suffer from 'sick building syndrome,'" Decherd said. "It doesn't take long for mold spores to take advantage of the moist environment and set in. Drying out the building ASAP and preventing mold growth from occurring in the first place was a vital first step toward ensuring the long term well being of employees."

In addition to drying out the facility and applying mold inhibitors, disinfecting and decontaminating surfaces and the building's contents was essential. Flood waters introduce all kinds of germs and debris to the environment, not to mention the sheer mess. "We were able to salvage a great deal of property," Decherd said. "But some items will need to be replaced."

Drying out flooded manufacturing facilities, commercial property, and homes quickly translates into fewer losses in the long run. "If we can remove the water before it causes structural damage and before mold appears, the building will require fewer repairs, but if we arrive too late, you're looking at extensive water damage."    

Dryout managed to dry out and decontaminate the air and fuel facility over the weekend, just in time for employees to return to work on Monday. While Florida remains swamped, Dryout has helped keep aviation flying and the 700 people that build jet components, dry, safe, and healthy.

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Mr. Mark Decherd
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