Over 90% of Workouts Are a Waste of Time, Says Fitness Author

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Pete Sisco, the best-selling author of multiple weightlifting books and e-books, says, "People in gyms perform hundreds of unnecessary workouts that have zero chance of transforming their bodies."

The absolute key to making consistent progress is to give your body time to fully recover and to also add a bit of new muscle. That takes time and the stronger you get, the more you lift so you need more time to recover. Many people can train productively lifting weights only once per month.

The reason to lift weights in a gym is to make your muscles stronger and attain the associated health benefits. But a best-selling fitness author says most people waste their time and effort by either lifting weights that are too light for them or by exercising when their muscles have not recovered from their previous workout.

"Most people have no idea they are wasting their time because they've never been told the underlying principles of strength training," says Sisco. "They expend energy and tire themselves out so they think their efforts are working. So people perform hundreds of unnecessary workouts that have zero chance of transforming their bodies."

Sisco - who is the co-author of Power Factor Training, Static Contraction Training and most recently the e-book Get This Strong - is a pioneer in the area of ultra-efficient strength training. "I've never been a hard-core bodybuilder. Those guys want to spend maximum time in the gym because that's their hobby. But for me, lifting weights is a means to get stronger so that I can use the strength doing something I enjoy outside of the gym and so I can get the health benefits of having more lean mass," says Sisco. "I started researching ways I could significantly increase my strength in the least amount of time, since I don't like spending lots of time in a gym."

Sisco claims his training takes only 1% to 2% of the time of conventional strength training. And how strong can his static contraction training method make you? On his GetThisStrong.com website a video clip shows the 49-year-old Sisco leg pressing a Toyota. Sisco claims his 16-year-old son, who also lifts the automobile, got strong enough to perform the feat in only 45 seconds of training time. Yes - seconds - not minutes or hours of training.

According to Sisco, "If you want to get strong the trump card is to lift a heavier weight for a very brief period rather than lift a lighter weight many times using multiple repetitions and several sets of repetitions as most people do. Static Contraction training shows people how to lift the heaviest weight they can in only their strongest and safest range of motion but to hold the weight statically for only five seconds."

"So to train for the car lift my son did a 5-second leg press with the most weight he could hold. Then he took about a week off and came back and did another 5-second lift with a bit more weight. That's how you know the previous workout was productive and you gave yourself adequate recovery time, because only then do you see an increase in your strength. After nine of those 5-second lifts he progressed to the point of being able to lift over 2,500 lbs on the leg press. There's no magic to it. And that's my point, anyone can get this strong."

For all the theatrics, Sisco mainly stresses the health benefits of strength training over the vanity aspects of hobby weightlifting or bodybuilding. "The value of strength training is hugely underrated. Unfortunately many people have been conditioned to think of grotesque muscularity and rampant steroid use when they think about lifting weights. That's a tragedy because strength, along with aerobics and flexibility, is one of the three measurements of overall fitness. And, speaking as a middle-aged person, muscularity is a key biomarker of aging. So the more muscular a man or woman is, the younger he or she is."

"It's a well established medical fact that productive weightlifting delivers increased lean mass, increased calorie burn at rest, lower blood pressure, and a half dozen other health benefits. But most people are very busy and setting aside time for three 45-minute workouts every week is just not practical."

Sisco's static contraction training routines typically address only five muscle groups per workout and with just five seconds of effort for each one his workouts are brief , to say the least. Also, this training is not nearly as frequent. "I like to say the three biggest lies in strength training are Monday, Wednesday and Friday", adds Sisco. "The absolute key to making consistent progress is to give your body time to fully recover and to also add a bit of new muscle. That takes time and the stronger you get, the more you lift so you need more time to recover. Many people can train productively lifting weights only once per month."

"If my son, or anyone else, tried to leg press a car three times a week he would fail because full recovery and compensation takes longer than that. So most people working out three times a week are just wasting their effort. The truth is anyone can reach his or her desired strength and muscularity in 1% to 2% of the total training time they devote to conventional training methods and schedules. So my training is ideal for busy people who want fitness results but don't want to make a hobby or a second job out of exercise. Almost everyone can afford time for 25 seconds of exercise once a month"

After doing a few reps on the leg press lifting the Toyota Sisco slams it down and says, "Anybody can get this strong."

Media Contact:

Susan Wilson
208 629-5497
Susan_Wilson(at)Me.com

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