Announcing An International Conference on Indian History ICIH 2009, January 9-11, 2009

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The International Conference on Indian History, to be held at the India International Centre on January 9-11, 2009 at New Delhi, will build upon the conclusions established in the seminar held at Dallas, Texas in 2007, and has basically two objectives. One is to increase awareness of strategic thinking and to show that a strategic approach based on long-term objectives is key to creating an environment for a civilization in which the future is less threatening and offers greater and better choices. The second objective is to increase awareness of the importance of learning the accurate history of India and its impact on the future choices that a country can, and should make in its vital interests.

The International Conference on Indian History, to be held at the India International Centre on January 9-11, 2009 at New Delhi, will build upon the conclusions established in the seminar held at Dallas, Texas in 2007, and has basically two objectives. One is to increase awareness of strategic thinking and to show that a strategic approach based on long-term objectives is key to creating an environment for a civilization in which the future is less threatening and offers greater and better choices. The second objective is to increase awareness of the importance of learning the accurate history of India and its impact on the future choices that a country can, and should make in its vital interests.

Background:
Due to imperial imperatives, the colonial powers in India contrived a false history of India in general, and completely mangled its chronology in particular. There is a need to correct the historical narrative of India that needs to be done from an Indian perspective and by historians and scholars whose professionalism is complete and who are not influenced either by an alien ideology, or a domestic political motive. We need to bring a sense of urgency to the task.

For it is clear that one cannot assume the presence of the Pundits in great numbers, in the future as they will migrate to positions that are more financially secure rather than do the arduous task of memorizing sizeable portion of the Veda as they have done in the past.

Further, there is a need to investigate and measure the socio-cultural consequences of youths learning contrived history during their formative years resulting in self-alienation and hatred towards their own cultural background. An overall assessment of the cultural damage caused to the society by contrived history needs to be made.
Consequently, it is imperative for the civil society and its plethora of stakeholders to come together, and develop and execute a plan of effective remediation in order to decolonize the discipline of History once and for all.

The Foundation will undertake a series of seminars annually with an exclusive focus on Indic history to specifically research the distorted history, investigate its consequences, assess its consequences, and remedy the situation by facilitating impartial/professional research into Indic history, and in addition will conduct programs to correct the history in the academia, media and in public perception.

The next step in the process is the International Conference on Indian History, to be held at the India International Centre, January 9-11, 2009 at New Delhi. The conference will build upon the conclusions established in the seminar held at Dallas, Texas in 2007, and has basically two objectives. One is to increase awareness of strategic thinking and to show that a strategic approach based on long-term objectives is key to creating an environment for a civilization in which the future is less threatening and offers greater and better choices. The second objective is to increase awareness of the importance of learning the accurate history of India and its impact on the future choices that a country can and should make in its vital interests.

It is estimated that the conference will need a basic minimum of $35,000 to assist students, and other deserving individuals to attend the Conference, and we request those who believe that India deserves an authentic history step forward to donate any amount of their choosing in order to further these causes.

Mainly Historical Themes:

  •     Is it a valid premise to assume that the current history is seriously mangled and distorted? We believe an objective appraisal of Indian history as exemplified in the presentations at HEC2007 came down heavily in favour of such a proposition, but we will keep an open mind and hear those who would argue against such a thesis
  •     Discuss the History of World democracy and India's place in such a history, the concept of the Chakravarthi, as the upholder of Dharma but not necessarily an absolute monarch
  •     Identify key distinguishing characteristics and dates of the Indic civilization of relevance to the current strategic environment facing India
  •     Indicate those areas of Indian history which are egregiously in error and the resulting impact on the manner in which India is viewed in the world today
  •     The British Colonial period
  •     Historiography of Indian Arts
  •     Provide examples of policy based on an erroneous interpretation of History
  •     Propose methodology and criteria to evaluate the accuracy of the current or future proposed narratives of Indic history
  •     Discuss the present day nonchalance towards history and rekindle the interest in History
  •     Discuss the Recognition and Revival of traditional knowledge systems in Republican India
  •     We know the history of a country affects the economic choices it makes, but how does the economic well-being - or lack thereof -- in a country or the economic choices it makes affect the history of the civilization.
  •     In the seventeenth century, as during most of the history during the Christian era, the Indian GDP according to Angus Madison comprised 25% of the world on a PPP basis. Examine the causes of the rapid deterioration in the economic well being of the subcontinent beginning after the Battle of Plassey, resulting in the First of the Great Famines of Bengal in 1777, and the death by slow starvation of 1/3rd of the population of Bengal.
  •     Discuss the potential impact of the new politically correct dogma, unique to India which goes under the name of Secularism and its impact on the historiography of India and the discipline of History, and more importantly the caricaturization of the Hindu as a Saffron Fascist
  •     Identity and Politics interact not only in history writing, but also in current affairs. How much of the identity politics today, including so called subaltern studies is a consequence of the massive distortion and reinventing of caste by the colonial overlord? Did the 1971 war and Pokhran I cause the large increase in funding of South Asian studies?
  •     Suggested List of theme titles

1. Perceptions of 'History' (with special reference to Indian history)
2. History and the Historian: Judging history versus pleading history
3. Colonial-Missionary distortions in Indian history
4. Impact of post-modernism and post-structuralism on contemporary Indian historiography
5. Post-Colonial distortions
6. Impact of history writing on identities and geopolitics today
7. Current status of the debate on Vedic-Harappan Identity
8. Ongoing debate on Indian history text-books in India and abroad
9. History of Indian Ocean Community
10. History of Indian Diaspora.
11. Women in Ancient India
The Occident and the Geopolitics of India

  •     Discuss the extent to which the current History of India is an Occidentalist Revision
  •     India and the U.S. form the two largest English speaking regions in the world and the 2 largest Democracies. In the past, the relationship has been nevertheless a difficult one. What is the future of this relationship? In about 3 decades, India will have the largest English language publishing industry in the world. What are the implications other than the purely commercial?
  •     Discuss the extent of India's contribution to technology and the sciences in the past, and the consequences for Indian policy makers in dealing with other civilizations and nation states. Discuss possible transfers of technology from India to Greece and later to Europe, and the impact it may have had on the resurgence of Europe such as the Renaissance and the Enlightenment. For instance, there is ample circumstantial evidence that the Gregorian calendar was fixed in 1582 after the Jesuits learned about sidereal measurements and the accurate trigonometric tables from the Jyotish in Kerala.
  •     Discuss the potential Indic origin of the realist imperative (e.g. John Meerscheimer and Hans Morgenthau) of the Occidental in his formulation of foreign policy (It is our contention that the imperative has been a significant strand in the Indic strategic weltanschuung, ever since the time of Sri Krishna in the Bhagavad-Gita. The efficacy with which he plied his craft is attested to by the fact that he was equally trusted by both parties in the war. Is India adhering to such Realist impulses, or is it just being pragmatic, or is it being weak-kneed in its approach to the major powers including the U.S., China and Russia?
  •     Discuss the implications of the Sarasvati Sindhu civilization on the posture of Pakistan, if any, and the relationship between India and Pakistan
  •     Encourage and report on independent studies of Mesoamerica by Indics to assess whether the Occidental has applied a similar Eurocentric approach to the historical narrative of the Incas and the Aztecs
  •     Discuss the various ways in which the Occidental has caricatured the Indic such as by reinventing the caste system as the prime determinant of the Indic civilization.
  •     Discuss the manner in which Indian literary and scientific historiography has been characterized by the Occident and the almost total ignorance of the works of such stalwarts as Bhartrihari among the youth of India today.
  •     The Goan inquisition and its impact on Indian society, especially in the Konkan area

Call for Papers:
Abstracts of papers for presentation at the conference are invited.
Deadline for Abstracts of Papers September 30, 2008. Deadline for full length papers is October 30, 2008.

Registration: Rs. 1000/- per person up to October 15, 2008. Late Registration: Rs. 2000/- after October 15, 2008 and Rs. 500 for Students and local delegates. Please send your registration fee by demand draft in the favour of 'Indic Studies Foundation.' payable on par at Delhi. If you wish to pay online and you are an international delegate, you can do so through PayPal at http://www.indicstudies.us. The registration for non-Indian delegates in US $ is $100/=.

Chairman of Conference:
Professor Shivaji Singh, Former Prof. Archeology & History Gorakhpur University, National President, Akhil Bharateeya Itihaasa Sankalan Yojana, India, Shivala Nagar, Mohaddipur, GORAKHPUR - 273008. +91- 9792250787, 9335449829 prof_sivaji @ yahoo.com

Convener of Conference:
Kosla Vepa, Executive Director, Indic Studies Foundation, 948 Happy Valley Rd., Pleasanton, Ca94566,
Tel.: 925-998-2529 (mobile) E-Mail Kosla.Vepa @ indicstudies.us

Executive Committee Co-Chairman:
J P Sharma, Former Add Secretary (IPS), OmPrakash Mishra, Associate Prof History National Law College Jodhpur, Prashant Bhardwaj, Manager IT GLPL Gurgaon

Planning Co - Chairmen:
Prashant Bharadwaj, #467, Sector-12A, Gurgaon, Haryana India +91-9910464100 Email: grdprashant @ gmail.com
OmPrakash Misra: omprakashnlu @ gmail.com

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