Community Colleges: Gateways to the Green Economy

Share Article

A new green economy is emerging in alternative energy, transportation, building and conservation and it's expected to create millons of new jobs. Community colleges are ground central for training the workforce to meet its needs. At the Green California Community College Summit, October 8 & 9 at the Pasadena Convention Centert, join facilities planners, engineers, designers, financial planners, administrators and others responsible for conceiving and executing successful green community college building and training programs .

Leaders from community colleges throughout the state will gather at the Pasadena Convention Center on October 8 and 9 at the Green California Community College Summit to consider the business case for greening their facilities, and the role that these institutions can play in building a "green economy" in California.

The Summit was developed under the leadership of an advisory board that includes leaders from the system, and is chaired by Secretary of State and Consumer Services, Rosario Marin, Commissioner Timothy A. Simon of the California Public Utilities Commission and Rocky Young, Chancellor Emeritus of the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD).

"Community colleges account for the lion's share of higher education enrollment in our state, and their student population mirrors California's rich diversity," said Commissioner Simon. "The majority of the workers needed to fill 'green jobs,' and to keep California on the cutting edge of the innovation and sustainability, will pass through their doors."

California community colleges are home to some of the country's most ambitious green building efforts. The LACCD's program, which has attracted international attention, is the largest green building initiative in the U.S. and includes the goal of taking all its campuses "off the grid," meaning they will become totally energy self-sufficient. The Newark Center for Health Sciences and Technology, at northern California's Ohlone College, recently became the world's first campus to achieve the highest possible green building rating, LEED-Platinum.

"With 109 campuses in diverse communities throughout the state, we have a unique opportunity to showcase sustainability and to demonstrate that doing the right thing can increase financial resources as well as quality of life," said Chancellor Emeritus Young. "This is a role that few, if any, other institutions could play in creating a better future."

To highlight best practices and effective strategies, the Summit will offer more than 40 educational sessions, led by the facilities planners, engineers, designers, financial planners, administrators and others responsible for conceiving and executing successful green community college building and training programs.

"There are many reasons why this Summit couldn't come at a better time," said Green Technology publisher Keith Miller. "Recent events point to the need to make the best use of existing resources and the importance of shoring up sectors of the economy with significant potential for growth."

For more information and registration, visit http://www.green-technology.org/ccsummit
For coverage of community college programs from Green Technology magazine, visit http://www.green-technology.org/green_technology_magazine

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Racquel Palmese
Visit website