October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month: Exposing the Hidden Truth

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Most of us are aware that domestic violence is a major problem in our culture. We've all heard stories of women who have dealt with an abusive spouse, or possibly know someone has been in that situation. But how many know that men are also victims of domestic violence and domestic abuse? Exposing the hidden truth: "Trapped in Silence," a new trailblazing book co-authored by Claudia and Kimberly, California Psychotherapists with Alternatives to Domestic Violence, who specialize in abuse issues with both victims and their perpetrators; focuses on the larger message that abuse against anyone is wrong and must be openly addressed.

What few people know is that

The Facts: According to Claudia Cornell, Psy.D. and Kimberly Taylor, M.S. "What few people know is that "every 37 seconds, a man is physically abused by an intimate partner," (Department of Justice/Center for Disease Prevention and Control report on the National Violence Against Women Survey). Kim Taylor, Program Director to Alternatives to Domestic Violence adds that in most cases, "the abuser is the man's wife or girlfriend."

Tough Economic Times often triggers Domestic Violence: With October being Domestic Violence Awareness Month, now is the perfect time to really become aware of this increasing problem, explains Dr. Cornell. With stress levels on the rise due to the economy, there are unfortunate consequences. Claudia states: "when there is a financial strain on the household, domestic violence becomes more prevalent regardless of gender."

Exposing the hidden truth: "Trapped in Silence," a new trailblazing book co-authored by Claudia and Kimberly, California Psychotherapists with Alternatives to Domestic Violence, who specialize in abuse issues with both victims and their perpetrators; focuses on the larger message that abuse against anyone is wrong and must be openly addressed.

Getting Help: Trapped in Silence, The book shines light on and creates awareness of this hidden abuse. The goal is to help break stereotypes and allow men the freedom to speak out and seek help. It is also designed to highlight warning signs of abuse and offer support for men who feel they have nowhere to turn.

Breaking Stereotypes: "Many people seem to think that men who find themselves in this type of situation are weak, however the opposite is true. They are not weak, they are in a very difficult situation," explains Kimberly Taylor, who is the Program Manager with Alternatives to Domestic Violence. "These men are often stable, moral, successful men," Dr. Cornell adds. "In fact, many of the abused men we know of are highly respected members of the community, including business owners, corporate executives, professional athletes and men who are active in their church."

The book is not only designed to help men caught in the abuse cycle but also to encourage abusive women to seek the treatment and counseling services that they need, so that the family structure can be maintained whenever possible.

http://www.womenabusingmen.org

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Anthony Mora
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