Children’s Hospital Boston’s Dr. Marsha Moses Elected to the Prestigious Institute of Medicine

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Marsha Moses, PhD., interim director, Vascular Biology Program at Children’s Hospital Boston, was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) on Monday, Oct. 13.

This esteemed honor has been awarded to one of Children’s finest and most visionary researchers

Marsha Moses, PhD., interim director, Vascular Biology Program at Children’s Hospital Boston, was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) on Monday, Oct. 13. Election to the IOM is considered one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine and recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service.

“This esteemed honor has been awarded to one of Children’s finest and most visionary researchers,” said James Mandell, MD, president and CEO, Children’s Hospital Boston. “The work Dr. Moses has done to advance research in vascular biology, particularly in the field of biomarkers, is truly impressive.”

Dr. Moses and her team of researchers have made substantial scientific contributions by identifying and characterizing the biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of angiogenesis during tumor progression. Her lab has also developed a number of sensitive and specific non-invasive urine tests for different cancers, as part of their long term Urinary Proteomics Initiative. These cancer tests are based on the lab's work focused on the detection of biomarker proteins purified from the urine of cancer patients. A number of these urine tests are currently in clinical testing as potential cancer diagnostics and prognostics.

"It is a great pleasure to welcome these distinguished and influential individuals to the Institute of Medicine," said IOM President Harvey V. Fineberg. "Members are elected through a highly selective process that recognizes people who have made major contributions to the advancement of the medical sciences, health care, and public health."

Dr. Moses received a PhD. from Boston University and completed a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral fellowship at Children's and MIT. She is the recipient of a number of NIH and foundation grants, while her awards and honors include the Cancer Research Foundation Award, American Cancer Society Research Award, the CaPCURE Research Award and the Science Scholar Fellowship Award, from The Mary Ingraham Bunting Institute of Radcliffe College. She also received Harvard Medical School's Clifford A. Barger Mentoring Award in 2003.

The IOM is unique for its structure as both an honorific membership organization and an advisory organization. Established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences, IOM has become recognized as a national resource for independent, scientifically informed analysis and recommendations on human health issues. With their election, members make a commitment to volunteer a significant amount of time as members of IOM committees, which engage in a broad range of studies on health policy issues.

Children’s Hospital Boston is home to the world’s largest research enterprise based at a pediatric medical center, where its discoveries have benefited both children and adults since 1869. More than 500 scientists, including eight members of the National Academy of Sciences, 11 members of the Institute of Medicine and 12 members of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute comprise Children’s research community. Founded as a 20-bed hospital for children, Children’s Hospital Boston today is a 397-bed comprehensive center for pediatric and adolescent health care grounded in the values of excellence in patient care and sensitivity to the complex needs and diversity of children and families. Children’s also is the primary pediatric teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School. For more information about the hospital and its research visit: http://www.childrenshospital.org/newsroom.

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Erin McColgan
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