Reese Witherspoon On VOGUE.com

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Mario Testino photographed Reese Witherspoon in a sapphire-blue dress by Nina Ricci for the November cover of Vogue. Inside, text by Robert Sullivan seven more stunning Testino shots trace Witherspoon through Paris for the VOGUE FEATURE "Innocence Abroad."

The November 2008 cover of Vogue

Reese Witherspoon is the kind of star we like to think of as being just like us: hardworking, from a small town, with a young family, a star who considers herself lucky to be a star, as we'd like to think we would.

Mario Testino photographed Reese Witherspoon in a sapphire-blue dress by Nina Ricci for the November cover of Vogue. Inside, seven more stunning Testino shots trace Witherspoon through Paris for the VOGUE FEATURE "Innocence Abroad."

Testino chronicles the girl-next-door blossomed into celebrity icon -- an aspirational beauty who wears hand-sewn ball gowns in Vogue-magazine spreads, who lingers in a Van Cleef & Arpels diamond necklace on the balcony of Hôtel de Crillon, and who, as casually as only a movie star could, dawdles at a café table, a pastry basket of temptations before her as she sips her morning coffee, her ankles laced in the snakeskin strings of Christian Louboutin pumps. Such is the tale of Vogue photography.

Vogue.com's VOGUE DIARY: Reese Witherspoon records the on-set hustle that brought the photo shoot to the pages of Vogue.

Sure, Witherspoon is promoting a film, and sure, she touts the upcoming romantic comedy Four Christmases, in which she acts opposite Vince Vaughn, who raves, as does director Seth Gordon, about her on-screen abilities and off-screen candor. Sure, Witherspoon revisits the ladder of movies that she climbed to Oscar fame. Sure, she's lauded for her philanthropic efforts with the Children's Defense Fund and as the first-ever Avon Global Ambassador.

But Witherspoon is also a mother who works, who has been through a divorce, who seems the kind of good girl a song would be written about, the kind who loves her mama and her boyfriend, Jake Gyllenhaal, too. Vogue writer Robert Sullivan senses her down-to-earth nature: "Reese Witherspoon is the kind of star we like to think of as being just like us: hardworking, from a small town, with a young family, a star who considers herself lucky to be a star, as we'd like to think we would."

Witherspoon is just a girl who -- like every girl -- walked by a store window and fell in love with a beautiful dress that she could not have. But in the fairy-tale world of movie stars like Reese Witherspoon, life really is as good as Vogue lets us imagine it could be: The Christian Dior dress was sewn in 1957 for a princess and hung so perfectly in the small Parisian shop window that the owner refused to sell the dress. Witherspoon begged and pleaded with the proprietor, but still he refused to sell it. On her third and final try, she ventured again down the out-of-the-way alley to the shop. When the owner saw how exceptionally the dress fit her, he decided it must belong to her and relented. That was the day that Reese Witherspoon bought the dress that she was wearing when she won an Academy Award. And the dress will hang in her closet happily ever after. Such is the end of a Vogue story.

VOGUE FEATURES probe the preeminent issues that concern women and culture. At the forefront of beauty, celebrity, and fashion, Vogue set the benchmark for photographic journalism and continues that legacy with photography by Annie Leibovitz, Patrick Demarchelier, Irving Penn, Mario Testino, Steven Meisel, Steven Klein, and Bruce Weber. Employing writers of an equally high caliber, Vogue solidified its intellectual reputation as a journalistic stalwart through its devotion to politics, philanthropy, science, and the arts. Vogue also concentrates on the coverage of society and sports.

VOGUE FEATURES are located on Vogue.com, the online counterpart of Vogue, a monthly magazine owned by Conde Nast Publications. Configured as a chapter within Style.com, Vogue.com contains separate content and operates independently of the host site. Caroline Palmer is the Online Editor of Vogue, and Vogue's Editor in Chief, Anna Wintour, directs the editorial content of Style.com, including that of Vogue.com.

Press inquiries should be directed to cameron_mcvey @ condenast.com.

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Cameron McVey
VOGUE
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