Learn To Avoid Common Problems And Create Portraits With Greater Visual Impact With This Book Published By Amherst Media

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Norman Phillips, author of Lighting Techniques for High Key Portrait Photography and Lighting Techniques for Low Key Portrait Photography, examines a much over-looked area of photography: the middle key. As Phillips shows, the fact that many photographers ignore middle key as a way of structuring their images results in portraits that may be cluttered or be visually confusing because elements of the scene, subject, clothing, props, and lighting are actually at odds with each other. By approaching these images with the concept of middle key in mind, it becomes much easier to avoid common errors and produce images with greater impact.

Lighting Techniques for Middle Key Portrait Photography

Packed with images and diagrams from over a dozen acclaimed photographers

Norman Phillips, author of Lighting Techniques for High Key Portrait Photography and Lighting Techniques for Low Key Portrait Photography, examines a much over-looked area of photography: the middle key. As Phillips shows, the fact that many photographers ignore middle key as a way of structuring their images results in portraits that may be cluttered or be visually confusing because elements of the scene, subject, clothing, props, and lighting are actually at odds with each other. By approaching these images with the concept of middle key in mind, it becomes much easier to avoid common errors and produce images with greater impact.

While photographers are generally familiar with high-key images (photographs with primarily very light tones paired with soft lighting) and low-key images (photographs with primarily dark tones paired with dramatic lighting), the concept of middle key (everything in between) is one that is often overlooked. This is surprising, since this is the key in which the vast majority of images are produced. Lighting Techniques for Middle Key Portrait Photography is now available.

As Norman Phillips shows, by approaching these images with the concept of middle key in mind, it becomes much easier to avoid common lighting errors and produce images with greater impact. These errors occur because photographers often decide to create a portrait that is not high key and not low key. This approach fails to provide sufficient structure because it does not precisely define the objectives of the shoot. As a result, the portraits produced may look cluttered or be visually confusing because elements of the scene, subject, clothing, props, and lighting are actually at odds with each other.

By consciously deciding to create a middle key portrait, on the other hand, photographers can help to avoid arbitrary decisions and begin more precisely selecting the kinds of colors and tones that will produce visual harmony and an overall more pleasing appearance in their portraits. They also have a starting point for devising a lighting setup that will harmonize well with all of the other elements in the image, drawing the viewer to just those areas of the scene or subject that the photographer intends to emphasize. Finally, they can implement all of these techniques that communicate the emotional impact they envision.

"Packed with images and diagrams from over a dozen acclaimed photographers", this book shows exactly how effective such a studied approach can be and provides the step-by-step explanations that enable readers to achieve similar results in their own work. Buy it here at Amazon.com

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KATE NEAVERTH
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