Get Radon On Your Radar

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared January "National Radon Action Month." In support of this nationwide call to action, First Alert is encouraging people across the country to get radon on their radar screens and to proactively test their homes for this potentially fatal gas.

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Aurora, Ill. (PRWEB) December 8, 2008

You can't see it, smell it or taste it - but it is in your home and it can kill you. What is it? Radon - an invisible, odorless and poisonous gas that causes tens of thousands of deaths each year. It is the second leading cause of lung cancer (number one among non-smokers) in the United States and is responsible for approximately 20,000 lung cancer deaths each year.

Based on these dangers and the increasing number of radon-related fatalities in the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared January "National Radon Action Month." In support of this nationwide call to action, First Alert is encouraging people across the country to get radon on their radar screens and to proactively test their homes for this potentially fatal gas.

How to take action:
According to the EPA, the typical radon concentration level in the indoor air of an average American home is about 1.3 pCi/L (pico Curies per Liter). A radon level above 4 pCi/L is considered dangerous and should be immediately mitigated. The problem lies in the fact that radon is virtually impossible to detect through human senses.

With the First Alert Radon Gas Test Kit, homeowners can put their minds at ease. Available for under $25 through most major retailers and hardware stores, or online at http://www.amazon.com and http://www.firstalertstore.com, the kit comes with all the materials needed to test a home's radon levels. It is safe and easy to use - just set it out for 24 hours and then mail the kit to the specified address for results.

For more information about radon, including its dangers, how to place and set up a test, and what to do in case high levels of radon are discovered, please contact us or visit http://www.firstalert.com or http://www.epa.gov/radon.

Contact:
Erin Kane
L.C. Williams and Associates
150 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 3800
Chicago, IL 60601
312-565-3900 or ekane@lcwa.com

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