Annotated Maps for Walking Tours of San Francisco Wine Bars Available Free On-Line

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America's top wine education organization announces publication of three Walking Tours of San Francisco Wine Bars with printable maps and venue descriptions. The tours are self-guided, and conveniently arranged around colorful neighborhoods to enhance the social experience. See http://www.brucecasswinelab.com

There's hasn't been a convenient place to park in San Francisco for twenty years. Why hassle with a car when you can amble casually between three or four wonderfully different wine bars and make new friends in each place?

One of America's top wine education organizations announced today it has published a set of three Walking Tours of San Francisco Wine Bars. Printable maps and venue descriptions can be found on-line at brucecasswinelab.com. The tours are self-guided, and conveniently arranged around colorful neighborhoods to enhance the social experience.

In total there are 25 wine bars recommended on the website. They are divided into three districts: (1) the Marina; (2) South Beach and the Waterfront (Downtown); and (3) Market Street and the Mission. The printable Walking Maps are accompanied by an annotated list which describes the vinous and social strengths of each Wine Bar. The maps also point out convenient forms of public transit. So there is no need to do any driving.

"Driving is for rookies," says Mike Logan, tender at one of the Bars. "There's hasn't been a convenient place to park in San Francisco for twenty years. Why hassle with a car when you can amble casually between three or four wonderfully different wine bars and make new friends in each place?"

Bruce Cass, Instructor at the Wine Lab classes, explains, "Sure, we don't want people driving drunk, but the other side of that same coin is enabling more fun in our local Wine Bars. If you don't have to worry about driving, you can feel free to try several wines side-by-side. That is the best way to learn about wine. And you can visit several different places. They all provide unique experiences. In fact, the neighborhoods themselves are different and somewhat unusual. That's one of the wonderful things about San Francisco, And, of course, the weather is almost always conducive to a genteel, window-shopping stroll."

"I spent a few hours in three of the Walking Tour Wine Bars last Thursday night," reports Samantha Lee, one of the Wine Lab's students. "Our group ranged between five and eight people at any given time. It was great. We had small plates of food to share in a couple of the places, and a whole bunch of wines. I didn't drink a glass of each, but I probably tasted 30 wines. One place specialized in Italian wines, and another was loaded with California wines from tiny wineries. The third place seemed to feature a convention of young single women, whatever that means. We had a lot of laughs."

Bruce Cass Wine Lab has taught Wine Appreciation classes in the San Francisco Bay Area for thirty years, beginning with 12 years on the Stanford University campus before moving to San Francisco. The classes are thoroughly objective; not promotional. "We don't own any inventory for sale," says Cass. Offerings for 2009 include multi-night Series, taught one night per week for several weeks, and Weekenders, aimed at out of town visitors. Weekenders are taught on Friday - Saturday - Sunday over a single weekend. See WineEducationVacation.com for the upcoming schedule.

The Wine Lab website also features a rich selection of informative content, including: recommendations for self-guided Wine Country Tours; suggestions on 50 unique San Francisco restaurants; California Vintage Reports going back 30 years; an annotated list of Leisure Activities in the Bay Area; and many authoritative articles on matters ranging from Starting Your Own Tasting Group to Matching Wines With Mexican Food. The Wine Lab also offers Gift Certificates for classes -- very popular during the holidays.

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