The Holiday Season Can Trigger Winter Allergies

Share Article

With the holiday season upon us, winter allergies are once again on the rise. From the first of December through New Year's Day, unlucky sufferers experience allergy symptoms including headaches, eye irritation and sinus congestion.

You'd expect a rise in allergy related sales during the spring, but we've also noticed that as soon as Thanksgiving rolls around, we see our sales take off as customers seek relief from their allergies. We get almost as many emails from allergy sufferers in the winter as we do in the spring

With the holiday season upon us, winter allergies are once again on the rise. From the first of December through New Year's Day, unlucky sufferers experience allergy symptoms including headaches, eye irritation and sinus congestion.

According to Wayne Perry, Director of Innovation for SiCap, LLC, sales for their Sinus Buster and Allergy Buster capsaicin nasal sprays spike throughout the holiday season.

"You'd expect a rise in allergy related sales during the spring, but we've also noticed that as soon as Thanksgiving rolls around, we see our sales take off as customers seek relief from their allergies. We get almost as many emails from allergy sufferers in the winter as we do in the spring", says Perry.

Perry claims that Allergy Buster's formula, made with Capsaicin Pepper and Nettle extract is excellent for relieving and preventing allergy symptoms. The Buster website also features links to information on how you can minimize the effect of allergies during the holidays.

There are many causes for holiday allergies including molds, artificial scents, and food. Many allergy sufferers have reactions to live Christmas trees, usually caused by molds growing naturally on the bark. Artificial trees aren't much better if they are stored in areas where mold can grow throughout the year. The same holds true for ornaments and other decorations that are packed away yearly. To avoid mold contamination, it's advisable to store decorations in a dry temperature controlled area, and seal the cartons tightly. When unpacking your holiday supplies, open the cartons outside or in the garage, and allow them to air out for at least 24 hours before bringing them into your home.

Other allergy triggers can be sparked from artificially scented candles and scented decorations. For example, many people are allergic to pine scented aerosol sprays that are used to add aroma to artificial trees. Increased alcohol and food consumption during the holidays can also trigger a variety of headaches and sinus problems. To avoid many of these triggers, moderation appears to be the key.

As with any successful personal health regimen, prevention is always the best way to avoid allergy triggers. In addition, adding a little heat from Buster brand capsaicin nasal sprays can also help you get through the holiday allergy season during the cold winter. For more information on avoiding and relieving winter allergies, visit SinusBuster.com.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

WAYNE PERRY
Visit website