Has Cutting Capital Gains Tax Rates Helped Cause the Recession?

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"Markets are not as free as they could be when different types of income are taxed differently. Uneven taxation distorts the economy," says Doug Seger, author of the new book, "Free Markets at Home: Changing the Tax System to Make Trade Freer Within the USA". Seger believes that tax changes and policy changes can: level the playing field for the working person, reduce the need to adjust interest rates, make health care more affordable, strengthen Social Security and Medicare, and result in a stronger economy.

Markets are not as free as they could be when different types of income are taxed differently. Uneven taxation distorts the economy

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"Markets are not as free as they could be when different types of income are taxed differently. Uneven taxation distorts the economy," says Doug Seger, author of the new book, "Free Markets at Home: Changing the Tax System to Make Trade Freer Within the USA". Seger believes that tax changes and policy changes can: level the playing field for the working person, reduce the need to adjust interest rates, make health care more affordable, strengthen Social Security and Medicare, and result in a stronger economy.

Seger claims that uneven taxation, such as taxing capital gains lower than regular, tilts the economic playing field. And that this unlevel playing field distorts the economy and likely has contributed to both the Great Depression and the current financial problems we are now seeing.

In his book, gradual tax changes are recommended that move toward taxing different types of income the same and reducing many tax deductions. A low federal sales tax is also recommended that could be increased as income tax rates are lowered.

The economic adjustment system advocated in this book would be a temporary measure of raising or lowering taxes to lessen the need of the Federal Reserve to raise or lower interest rates. Seger contends that interest rates could be more stable by giving the Federal Reserve another tool to make economic adjustments.

The goals of a new health care system could be to get nearly everyone in the system to have competitive pricing, and not to disrupt the health insurance plans that people currently have. Outlined in this book is a health care structure that would involve a new tax for people without health insurance and the government providing health care for these people. Health insurance companies would be required to take a percentage of their customers from the government.

A broader tax base for Social Security and Medicare, lower health care costs, and some reasonable adjustments would greatly strengthen Social Security and Medicare according to Seger. Comments are also made on corporations, depreciation, tariffs, trade agreements, the national debt, and spending.

He speculates on the effects of tax policies in connection with the Great Depression, CEO pay, and income inequality. A theme expressed through out the book is that markets should be freer within the United States.

Seger's writing is non-technical and he covers much territory in this short 102-page book. "Free Markets at Home" is likely to be of interest to the general public as well as to tax policy specialist.

Visit: http://www.FreeMarketsAtHome.com for more information.

Contact:
Doug Seger
Patoka Publishing LLC
patokapublishing (at) copper (dot) net
812-678-3850

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