Recharge Your Swimming Routine: Applying Basic Changes Can Increase Performance, Enjoyment and Fitness, Says Human Kinetics

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Regardless of venue or goals--competition or fitness--any swimmer can benefit from assessing his or her goals, techniques, and training program. Now swimming legend Jim Montgomery offers advice for adult swimmers who want to improve their strokes, add variety and purpose to workouts, or learn more about the lifelong sport in the upcoming book Mastering Swimming (Human Kinetics, 2009).

Regardless of venue or goals¬--competition or fitness--any swimmer can benefit from assessing his or her goals, techniques, and training program. Now swimming legend Jim Montgomery offers advice for adult swimmers who want to improve their strokes, add variety and purpose to workouts, or learn more about the lifelong sport in the upcoming book Mastering Swimming (Human Kinetics, 2009).

"A successful swimming experience begins with the basics of body balance, relaxed breathing, and efficient stroke technique," Montgomery says. In Mastering Swimming, Montgomery and coauthor Mo Chambers advise swimmers to improve technique for each stroke by analyzing three essential elements:

1. Maintain a long body line that moves through the water with a minimum amount of resistance.
2. Generate power from the core.
3. Stay relaxed and in the flow of the stroke.

Flip-turn technique also gets Montgomery's attention. "Should you choose to compete in a pool meet or simply want to improve your workouts, it is essential that you negotiate the walls quickly, smoothly, and with minimum resistance," he says. Montgomery offers simple, illustrated steps of the basic flip turn. "You will find it is a lot less mysterious--and a lot more fun--than it looks," he adds.

In addition to technique, Montgomery explains that swimmers can improve performance through conditioning and modifying workouts. "Perhaps the most creative part of swimming is molding your workouts to achieve your goals," Montgomery states.

Versatile workouts both in and out of the pool are essential for improved fitness because they work different muscle groups and cause a varied heart rate. "Consistent and well-designed dryland workouts will transform a good swim program into a great swim program," Montgomery explains. "Your time in the gym and your time in the pool will work together to create a balanced and truly injury-proof training program."

Mastering Swimming offers stroke instruction, sample workout plans, and tips for open-water swimming and shaving time off starts and turns. For more information on Mastering Swimming or other swimming books, visit http://www.HumanKinetics.com or call 1-800-747-4457.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Jim Montgomery has held 10 swimming world records and won 9 world championships, 14 national titles, and 7 NCAA titles. As a member of the 1976 U.S. Olympic team in Montreal, he won three gold medals and one bronze. He was the first person ever to break 50 seconds in the 100-meter freestyle, a feat some have compared to Roger Bannister's breaking the four-minute-mile barrier in track. In 1981 he founded Dallas Aquatic Masters, one of the largest and most successful masters swim programs in the United States, and has been its head coach from day 1. Since 1998, Montgomery has also served as aquatics director at Greenhill School in Dallas. In 1986, he was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame and was the 2002 United States Masters Swimming Coach of the Year. Montgomery has competed and given swim clinics in Japan, Hong Kong, Brazil, England, France, Germany, Italy, Thailand, Mexico, and Finland as well as throughout the United States.

Mo Chambers was a software engineer for a large Silicon Valley company when, at age 30, she decided to take a job teaching a group of eager adult swimmers at a local health club. This side job soon became an all-consuming passion that would bring her national recognition. Within a year she left her engineering job to coach swimming full time. She took the helm of Mountain View Masters Swim Club and in seven years developed the club from 30 to more than 350 members. In 1993-94, she worked with well-known coaches Richard Quick and Bill Boomer on Stanford's women's swim team. In 1996, she was named USMS Coach of the Year. Chambers is a prolific writer for Swim, USMS Swimmer, and the ASCA newsletter. She is currently chairperson of the USMS coaches committee.

CONTENTS

Part I: Taking the Plunge
Chapter 1. Start With a Vision, Train With a Plan
Chapter 2. Set the Stage for Success
Chapter 3. Develop Your Water Sense

Part II: Fine-Tuning Your Strokes
Chapter 4. Freestyle
Chapter 5. Backstroke
Chapter 6. Butterfly
Chapter 7. Breaststroke
Chapter 8. Starts, Turns, and Finishes

Part III: Conditioning for Success
Chapter 9. Workout Essentials
Chapter 10. Pool Workouts
Chapter 11. Dryland Training
Chapter 12. Open-Water Training
Chapter 13. Make Your Plan for Success

Part IV: Competition
Chapter 14. Competing in Pool Events
Chapter 15. Competing in Open Water

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Patty Lehn
Human Kinetics
217-403-7558
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