Medical Evidence Supports Detainees' Accounts of Torture in U.S. Custody

Physicians for Human Rights (PHR) has published a landmark report documenting medical evidence of torture and ill treatment inflicted on 11 men detained at US facilities in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Guantánamo Bay, who were never charged with any crime. The physical and psychological evaluation of the detainees and documentation of the crimes are based on internationally accepted standards for clinical assessment of torture claims. The report also details the severe physical and psychological pain and long-term disability that has resulted from abusive and unlawful U.S. interrogation practices.

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After years of disclosures by government investigations, media accounts, and reports from human rights organizations, there is no longer any doubt as to whether the current administration has committed war crimes. The only question is whether those who ordered the use of torture will be held to account.

Cambridge, MA (PRWEB) June 17, 2008

Physicians for Human Rights (PHR) has published a landmark report documenting medical evidence of torture and ill-treatment inflicted on 11 men detained at US facilities in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Guantánamo Bay, who were never charged with any crime. The physical and psychological evaluation of the detainees and documentation of the crimes are based on internationally accepted standards for clinical assessment of torture claims. The report also details the severe physical and psychological pain and long-term disability that has resulted from abusive and unlawful US interrogation practices.

"Rigorous clinical evaluations confirm the enormous and enduring toll of agony and anguish inflicted for months by US personnel on eleven men who were detained without any charge or explanation," stated PHR President Leonard Rubenstein. "Their first-hand accounts, now confirmed by medical and psychological examinations, take us behind the photographs to write a missing chapter of America's descent into the shameful practice and official policy of systematic torture."

Broken Laws, Broken Lives: Medical Evidence of Torture by US Personnel and Its Impact documents practices used to bring about excruciating pain, terror, humiliation, and shame for months on end. These practices included, but were not limited to:

  •     Suspensions and other stress positions;
  •     Routine isolation;
  •     Sleep deprivation combined with sensory bombardment and temperature extremes;
  •     Sexual humiliation and forced nakedness;
  •     Sodomy;
  •     Beatings;
  •     Denial of medical care;
  •     Electric shock;
  •     Involuntary medication; and
  •     Threats to their lives and families.
In the foreword to the report, Maj. General Antonio Taguba (USA-Ret.), who led the U.S. Army's investigation into the Abu Ghraib detainee abuse scandal, wrote: "After years of disclosures by government investigations, media accounts, and reports from human rights organizations, there is no longer any doubt as to whether the current administration has committed war crimes. The only question is whether those who ordered the use of torture will be held to account."

"Ending the use of torture, while essential, is not enough. The United States government must make this right. Those responsible for these abuses must help heal the grievous harm inflicted in our name," said PHR CEO Frank Donaghue. "PHR is calling for full investigation, accountability, an official apology, and reparations, including medical and psychological treatment for the survivors."

To download PHR's Broken Laws, Broken Lives report (PDF), visit http://brokenlives.info.

Physicians for Human Rights (PHR) mobilizes the health professions to advance the health and dignity of all people by protecting human rights. As a founding member of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, PHR shared the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize.

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