Craftsmanship Meets Innovation -- Mantels of Yesteryear Debuts Motorized Mirror

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Mantels of Yesteryear unveils a novel design, the Motorized Mirror -- a historically accurate, remote control mirror which covers a spot on the mantel designed to house a television. Check out their before and after photos to see latest project and showcases the unlimited possibilities they have available.

We're not in the business of selling cheap particle-board mantels

New and unique, the Motorized Mirror from Mantels of Yesteryear (http://www.mantelsofyesteryear.com) brings beautiful and detailed traditional mantels into the twenty-first century. The company creates stunning and stylish restorations that are also perfectly functional. Remote control mirrors conceal a space reserved for a big screen TV. A beautiful cosmetic centerpiece can now become a functional centerpiece of any living space as well.

Twenty years ago, Park Pigott began in his suburban Atlanta garage creating high-end reproductions to accommodate the needs of modern homes. The company now offers a wide range of mantels inspired by popular styles from the late 1700s to the early 1900s, along with colonnades, shelves, hand-hewn beams and pier mirrors. There are even some grand antique mantels still available.

Today, distinctive homes across the country boast breathtaking focal points: original and antique reproduction mantels handcrafted by Pigott's thriving family business. Mantels of Yesteryear mantels are unparalleled in the industry. The company has a unique ability to customize any mantel with different woods, finishes, carvings and mirrors while maintaining its legendary quality. Pigott and his team regularly create mantels based on a client's photo, magazine clipping or drawing. Even the mantel opening size can be changed to fit a client's needs.

"We're not in the business of selling cheap particle-board mantels," Pigott stated. "Our mantels and colonnades are high-end. We do everything in-house, and we provide mantels that homeowners are proud to display in their homes. Less than five percent of our mantels are painted; a full 95 percent have a furniture-grade finish. All are carefully crafted without needing to use veneer, putty, caulking or paint."

Mantels of Yesteryear designed motorized mirrors out of their strong desire to stay true to their craft. Four years ago a client wanted to put a flat-screen television in the middle of the mantel. Pigott refused to build a mantel with a television centerpiece and brainstormed with his team -- wife Jeanette, sons Park III and Slade, and daughter-in-law Kellye -- until they hit on the idea of implementing both a historically accurate mirror and a flat-screen television. The Mantels of Yesteryear motorized mirror comes with a remote control that slides the mirror up to reveal the flat-screen television beneath. This option is available on almost any mantel with a mirror. It is now one of the company's most popular items.

Discerning homeowners will find full mantels and half mantels, mantel shelves, colonnades and a variety of styles to suit any taste, from rustic to modern. Thanks to a new CNC machine, Mantels of Yesteryear no longer uses composition carvings or capitals but instead carves intricate designs directly into its quarter-sawn oak, cherry and mahogany mantels.

"We have over 100 mantels on the floor in our showroom, and more than that in our catalog," Pigott explained. "We can customize every one of those models to our clients' specifications. That's a nearly endless number of mantels to choose from."

Mantels of Yesteryear's line is available at the company's showroom in McCaysville, Ga., on their website and through dealers throughout the U.S. Purchase directly from Mantels of Yesteryear or at a dealer near you. To learn more about Mantels of Yesteryear, or to view the company's mantels, visit http://www.mantelsofyesteryear.com.

Contact: Slade Pigott Mantels of Yesteryear PH 888-292-2080 FX 888-292-2088 http://www.mantelsofyesteryear.com

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Slade Pigott
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